entrapment


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entrapment

/en·trap·ment/ (en-trap´ment) compression of a nerve or vessel by adjacent tissue.

entrapment

(en-trap′mĕnt)
In medicine, compression, as of a peripheral nerve or vessel.

entrapment,

n pathologic constriction on a vessel or nerve by swollen or hypertonic soft tissue and/or bone.

entrapment

the state of being trapped.

bowel entrapment
the intestine is caught up in adhesions or peritoneal ligaments. Obstruction, with or without compromise of the blood supply to the incarcerated loop, follows.
epiglottic entrapment
legal entrapment
the legal device by which a suspect is tempted to infringe the law or rules while under observation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demyelination and remyelination: This has been suggested to be the mechanism underlying the slowing in nerve conduction in chronic nerve compression as seen in entrapment neuropathies.
Gout-related tophi leading to entrapment neuropathy are rare.
Apart from anomaly of uterus the other rare cause which has to be kept in mind is entrapment caused by abnormal contraction (Contracture) between well-formed upper and lower uterine segment.
As conclusions, a composite score was formulated in which, along with the recommendations of the American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AAEM) for entrapment neuropathies, the parameters having the highest percentage of changes have been considered.
In this research, multiple linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient were used to investigate the relationships between self-compassion and entrapment.
Because the entrapment defense is the primary mechanism that the judicial system has developed for policing undercover operations, (28) it is important that the defense have bite.
In this article, we discuss and evaluate sentence mitigation as a judicial remedy for entrapment, focusing on a distinction present in both Australian and Canadian jurisprudence between entrapment in the strict sense and "entrapment-type" practices that fall short of unlawful entrapment but often play a significant role in the sentencing process.
The patient's diagnosis was revised to peripheral entrapment of the saphenous nerve at the adductor canal.
Part II connects these ideas to the development of the entrapment doctrine in American courts in the early twentieth century, when the notion of criminal predisposition became the dispositive feature of the entrapment inquiry.
Prosecutors will attempt to refute claims of entrapment in the courtroom, but, actually, cases are won or lost in the planning stages of the investigation.
Functional popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (FPAES) should be considered when symptoms like numbness or tingling are present, with or without paresthesias.