entrain

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entrain

(ĕn-trān′)
To alter the biological rhythm of an organism so that it assumes a cycle different from a 24-hour one.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eggs detached on the day of larval release hatch near the time of larval release by the female (De Vries and Forward, 1991), which indicates that the endogenous rhythms are entrained in the embryos.
The mature embryos have sensory systems that detect environmental cycles, and the rhythms become entrained to these cycles independent of the female.
sayi, then another question arises: How does the female entrain the rhythm in her embryos?
Females with embryos at all stages of development were collected from the estuary, where they were entrained to the ambient, 14:10-h light-dark and tidal cycles.
Second, the embryos must he able to entrain to the light/dark cycle independently of the female.
First, females with embryos in all stages of development were collected from the estuary where they were entrained to the ambient 14:10 light/dark cycle.
Preliminary experiments found that three diel cycles was sufficient to entrain the rhythm to a new photoperiod that was reversed in timing from the ambient cycle.
Prior to experimentation, ovigerous females with immature embryos were entrained to the ambient 13:11-h light/dark cycle, in which the dark phase began at about 2000 h.
It is also not known how corals sense lunar cycles and translate this information into the sequence of physiological processes that mature gametes and determine the date of spawning, or whether these are entrained processes or are directly under the control of environmental factors.
The coral response to lunar light could be direct or entrained. If it were direct, changing lunar irradiance would have an immediate effect on the process responding to light; if it were entrained, removal of the cycle synchronizing light would result in a modest phase shift as the cycle free runs--a state than can last for a long time.
The ability to reset spawning time so quickly argues that this is not an entrained process, but this has not yet been conclusively demonstrated.
These results show that corals share at least two of the genes known to regulate entrained genetic networks in other animals and also in plants.