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en·tire

(en-tīr'),
Having a smoothly continuous edge or border without indentations or projections; denoting a margin, as of a bacterial colony.

entire

(ĕn-tīr′)
adj.
Not castrated.
n.
An uncastrated horse; a stallion.

en·tire′ness n.

entire

(of plant structure) not toothed or cut.

entire

a term used in reference to an uncastrated animal, male or female.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a group environ mental portrait, an entirely different approach from my other examples.
In most cases, this change would result in an increase in taxable income generally taken into account entirely in the earliest open year under examination.
If I give myself entirely to a person, there is nothing left over and at my disposal to give to someone else.
Her voice is an unusual, albeit entirely engaging voice very similar to Christopher's in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon.
The migration routes of the Pacific loon and the whooping crane are located entirely west of the Mississippi River.
Miller was there physically, yes, but he was entirely absent, awash in decontextualized information.
Tokyo, Japan, Oct 21, 2005 - (JCN Newswire) - AIST has announced a technique to fabricate radio frequency (RF) ID tags entirely by printing.
As they were entirely without provisions and a number of them sick from exposure in the boats, four men volunteered to take one of the boats and go to Shumushiri [sic], where there is a Japanese settlement, for assistance.
The fifth annual Smoke Free Schools awards are being staged to encourage schools to be entirely smoke-free and provide smoking education for pupils.
Gropius' Fagus Factory of 1911 was one of the first examples of a glass facade supported by a thin steel framework, and Bruno Taut's polygonal Glashaus Pavilion for the 1914 Werkbund Exhibition in Cologne was made entirely from glass, dramatically celebrating its ephemeral, crystalline properties.
In both of his examples, Gutas seeks to present the multiple interpretations of Islamic sensibilities that were espoused by scholars and rulers to the entirely antithetical ends of promoting or opposing scientific inquiry based on the Greek rationalistic model.