enthesis


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enthesis

 [en´thĕ-sis]
the site of attachment of a muscle or ligament to bone.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In DISH, also known as the Forestier disease or ankylosing hyperosteosis, new bone is formed in the anterior longitudinal ligament enthesis, which is predominantly found in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae.
This would include tendon, ligament, enthesis, muscle, and even the bladder wall.
Histological studies affirm that functional restoration of the rotator cuff occurs through this repair process and that the original fibrocartilage enthesis between the tendon and bone does not regenerate.
Orientational analysis of the achilles tendon and enthesis using an ultrashort echo time spectroscopic imaging sequence.
This, coupled with the fact that methods for assessing obesity from skeletal remains often struggle to discern between obesity and highly active individuals (e.g., enthesis robusticity; Godde & Taylor 2013), means that it is currently not readily feasible to assess obesity from subadult skeletal remains.
Characteristic SIJ lesion types in MRI are evaluated in two groups; active inflammatory lesions (bone marrow edema, capsulitis, synovitis, enthesis) and chronic inflammatory lesions (sclerosis, erosion, fat deposition, ankylosis) (10).
Nail changes are a marker of psoriatic arthritis, and magnetic resonance imaging showed that nail enthesis is associated with the nail, the distal phalanx, and distal interphalangeal joints and therefore may cause PsA [10].
Injuries to the tendon-to-bone enthesis are common in the field of orthopedic medicine, and high failure rates are often associated with their repair [1].
SAPHO syndrome shares clinical and radiologic features with spondyloarthropathy (SpA), including sacroiliitis, enthesis, paravertebral ossifications, and ankylosis, and many times is associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease.
Any complete rupture of any heads involving either the myotendinous junction or enthesis site should be treated surgically.
Dunsmuir et al., "Brief report: group 3 innate lymphoid cells in human enthesis," Arthritis & Rheumatology, vol.