enterotoxin


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enterotoxin

 [en´ter-o-tok″sin]
a toxin specifically affecting cells of the intestinal mucosa, causing vomiting and diarrhea, such as those elaborated by species of Bacillus, Clostridium, Escherichia, Staphylococcus, and Vibrio.

en·ter·o·tox·in

(en'tĕr-ō-tok'sin),
A cytotoxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.

enterotoxin

/en·tero·tox·in/ (en´ter-o-tok″sin)
1. a toxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.
2. a toxin arising in the intestine.
3. an exotoxin that is protein in nature and relatively heat-stable, produced by staphylococci.

enterotoxin

(ĕn′tə-rō-tŏk′sĭn)
n.
Any of various bacterially produced toxins that specifically affect intestinal cells and cause vomiting and diarrhea, as in staphylococcal food poisoning and cholera.

enterotoxin

[-tok′sin]
a toxic substance that causes an adverse reaction by cells of the intestinal mucosa. Most enterotoxins are produced by certain species of bacteria, such as Staphylococcus.

enterotoxin

Infectious disease A toxin with a direct effect on the intestinal mucosa, eliciting net fluid secretion; the 'classic' enterotoxin is cholera toxin, which evokes intestinal fluid secretion, by activating adenylate cyclase. See Endotoxin, Exotoxin.

en·ter·o·tox·in

(en'tĕr-ō-tok'sin)
A cytotoxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.

enterotoxin

Any bacterial toxin that damages intestinal tissue and causes diarrhoea and vomiting, the signs of food poisoning.

Enterotoxin

A type of harmful protein released by bacteria and other disease agents that affects the tissues lining the intestines.
Mentioned in: Dysentery

enterotoxin

1. a toxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.
2. a toxin arising in the intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
perfringens enterotoxin is inactivated at 140 [degrees]F (60[degrees]C) for five min (International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods, 2003).
The strain was negative for Panton-Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1, enterotoxins A, B, C, E, and H, and exfoliative toxins A and B, but it harbored genes for enterotoxins D, G, and I.
The cytotoxic activities of the LCE were neutralized by homologous antiserum but were not neutralized by the anticholera enterotoxin (CT) while it was partially neutralized by anti-LT-1 produced by enterotoxigenic E.
Comparative effects of osmotic, sodium nitrite-induced, and pH-induced stress on growth and survival of Clostridium perfringens type A isolates carrying chromosomal or plasmid-borne enterotoxin genes.
Predominant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from antibiotic-associated diarrhea is clinically relevant and produces enterotoxin Aand the bicomponent toxin LukE-LukD.
Diverse enterotoxin gene profiles among clonal complexes of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from the Bronx, New York.
On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that this enterotoxin maintains biological activity after heating to 60 [degrees]C for 16 hours, and the optimum temperature for producing it in cultures is 39.
Growth abilities and enterotoxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains in herby cheese.
Three target genes, cytolytic enterotoxin (AHCYTOEN), hemolysin (Hly) and bacterial outer membrane protein (OmpTS) genes have been chosen for detecting virulent bacteria from those samples.
Sha J, Kozlova EV, Fadl AA, Olano JP, Houston CW, Peterson JW, et al (2004) Molecular characterization of a glucose-inhibited division gene, gidA, that regulates cytotoxic enterotoxin of Aeromonas hydrophila.