enterotoxin


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enterotoxin

 [en´ter-o-tok″sin]
a toxin specifically affecting cells of the intestinal mucosa, causing vomiting and diarrhea, such as those elaborated by species of Bacillus, Clostridium, Escherichia, Staphylococcus, and Vibrio.

en·ter·o·tox·in

(en'tĕr-ō-tok'sin),
A cytotoxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.

enterotoxin

(ĕn′tə-rō-tŏk′sĭn)
n.
Any of various bacterially produced toxins that specifically affect intestinal cells and cause vomiting and diarrhea, as in staphylococcal food poisoning and cholera.

enterotoxin

Infectious disease A toxin with a direct effect on the intestinal mucosa, eliciting net fluid secretion; the 'classic' enterotoxin is cholera toxin, which evokes intestinal fluid secretion, by activating adenylate cyclase. See Endotoxin, Exotoxin.

en·ter·o·tox·in

(en'tĕr-ō-tok'sin)
A cytotoxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.

enterotoxin

Any bacterial toxin that damages intestinal tissue and causes diarrhoea and vomiting, the signs of food poisoning.

Enterotoxin

A type of harmful protein released by bacteria and other disease agents that affects the tissues lining the intestines.
Mentioned in: Dysentery
References in periodicals archive ?
All isolates were characterized for SCCmec types (I-V) and subtype of SCCmecIV (IVa, IVb, IVc and IVd), (4) agr polymorphism (I-IV), (5) and for the presence of 14 virulence genes, including nine enterotoxins (sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg,seh, sei,sej), two exfoliatins (eta and etb), the toxic shock syndrome toxin (tsst), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl), and icaA.
Comparison of genotypes and enterotoxin genes between Staphylococcus aureus isolates from blood and nasal colonizers in a Korean hospital.
The enterotoxin genes, sea, seb, and seg used for this purpose give high evidence that milk and its products are responsible for many cases of food poisoning in Al-Diwaniyah city.
Other common virulence factors were proteases (50%), DNases (50%), enterotoxins (63%), and lipopolysaccharide (70%).
Harf-Monteil et al., "Predominant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from antibiotic-associated diarrhea is clinically relevant and produces enterotoxin A and the bicomponent toxin LukE-lukD," Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol.
Bile acids have been reported to have inhibitory or stimulatory effects on the sporulation and production of enterotoxin in various strains of C.
perfringens enterotoxin detection in the stool of two or more ill persons confirms C.
The second hypothesis held that the bacteria population within the chicken taco meat mixture had either reached death phase due to gross spoilage, diminishing nutrients, and a changing pH environment, or had been diminished by the final reheating prior to service on April 15 without harming the integrity of the enterotoxin.
Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most common foodborne illnesses in the world and occurs after ingestion of Staphylococcal Enterotoxins (SE), which are produced by enterotoxigenic strains of Staphylococcus, mainly S.
One of these, staphylococcal enterotoxin type E (SEE), has been associated with outbreaks in the United States, the United Kingdom, and France.
Friedman, "Plant compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis," in Atopic Dermatitis-Disease Etiology and Clinical Management, J.