enterotoxemia


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enterotoxemia

 [en″ter-o-tok-se´me-ah]
a condition characterized by the presence in the blood of toxins produced in the intestines.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·ter·o·tox·e·mi·a

(en'tĕr-ō-tok-sē'mē-ă)
The presence of an enterotoxin in the blood.
Synonym(s): enterotoxaemia.
[enterotoxin + G. haima, blood]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
perfringens type D bacterin toxoid (CPBT) of the commercially available enterotoxemia vaccine, prepared in Veterinary Research Institute (VRI) Peshawar, Pakistan while Group C was kept as negative control.
[5] Dray, T., 2004, "Clostridium perfringens type A [beta]2 toxin associated with enterotoxemia in a 5-week-old goat," Can.
Enterotoxemia is caused by the overgrowth of detrimental or bad bacteria.
perfringens causes an enterotoxemia of sheep (and to a rare extent goats and cattle).
Enterotoxemia (ehn-tar-o-tock-sem-e-ah) Also known as overeating disease, enterotoxemia is caused by bacteria and affects goats and sheep.
It has long been recognized that ruminants switching from a natural diet of browse (a cellulose-based diet) to one of more readily digestible carbohydrates (a starch-based diet), such as corn and wheat, are predisposed to developing conditions such as enterotoxemia, polioencephalomalacia, acute rumenitis, liver abscesses, laminitis, and to sudden death.
Calves, like lambs and kids, are subject to enterotoxemia (overeating disease) if stressed or poorly transitioned from a high-forage to a high-grain diet.
Biological Agents Incubation time Fatalities (days) (percent) Disease Anthrax 1 to 5 80 Plague 1 to 5 90 Tularemia 10 to 14 5 to 20 Cholera 2 to 5 25 to 50 Venezuelan equine encephalitis 2 to 5 <1 Q fever 12 to 21 <1 Botulism 3 30 Staphylococcal enterotoxemia 1 to 6 <1 (food poisoning) Multiple organ toxicity Dose dependent SOURCE: Department of Defense.
Some calves develop calf bloat, an acute enterotoxemia (toxic gut infection), caused by bacterial toxins.