enteropathogen


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enteropathogen

 [en″ter-o-path´o-jen]
a microorganism that causes disease of the intestine. adj., adj enteropathogen´ic.

en·ter·o·path·o·gen

(en'tĕr-ō-path'ō-jen),
An organism capable of producing disease in the intestinal tract.

enteropathogen

(ĕn′tə-rō-păth′ə-jən, -jĕn′)
n.
A microorganism capable of producing intestinal disease.

en′ter·o·path′o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

en·ter·o·path·o·gen

(en'tĕr-ō-path'ŏ-jen)
An organism capable of producing disease in the intestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study applied comprehensive microbiological and molecular methods to detect viruses, bacteria, and parasites in the study population, which is expected to increase the sensitivity of enteropathogen detection.
The effects of polar lipids and triterpene glycosides isolated from various species of marine macrophytes and invertebrates on the immunogenicity and conformation of model protein antigens (porin from enteropathogen Y.
However, reports of coinfection with both of these enteropathogens are limited, and no pseudocyst stage of T.
coli as an enteropathogen became firmly established, however, by the discovery that some E.
Yersinia enterocolitiea is a gram-negative rod-shaped enteropathogen closely related to Eseherichia coli.
(2005) reported that houseflies trap the enteropathogen Aeromonas caviae between successive layers of their PTM, and the PTM in larval Trichoplusia ni has been shown to limit infection by baculovirus (Wang and Grandados, 1998).
To determine the etiologic agent, stool samples (i.e., either rectal swabs or bulk stools) were sent to one of several laboratories of HCHD, BCM, and TCH for diagnosis of bacterial, parasitic, and viral enteropathogens. In stool samples from 44 patients tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, norovirus was confirmed in 22 (50%) specimens; no other enteropathogen was identified.
Many cases of gastroenteritis without a confirmed enteropathogen have viral causes.
Repeated sampling from patients in our study who had diarrhoea of unknown cause or persistent diarrhoea which was attributed to antibiotics may have yielded an enteropathogen such as C.
Other basic clinical data of the children with diarrhea caused by a single enteropathogen are shown in Table 2.
Campylobacter is an important human enteropathogen bacterium, and C.