enterolithiasis


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en·ter·o·li·thi·a·sis

(en'tĕr-ō-li-thī'ă-sis),
Presence of calculi in the intestine.

enterolithiasis

(ĕn′tə-rō-lĭ-thī′ə-sĭs)
n.
The presence of calculi in the intestine.

en·ter·o·li·thi·a·sis

(en'tĕr-ō-li-thī'ă-sis)
Presence of calculi in the intestine.

enterolithiasis

Stones (calculi) in the bowel.
References in periodicals archive ?
The colon, including the appendix, is the most common location of enterolithiasis. In the small intestine, the most common location is the terminal ileum, where alkaline pH favors calcium salt precipitation over food particles which act as a nidus.
Enterolithiasis may also present with peritonitis secondary to perforation.
X-ray detection of enterolithiasis depends on the calcium content of the stone.
In summary, there is no evidence for the prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic enterolithiasis in tuberculosis.
Enterolithiasis is a rare finding, but its incidence and prevalence has been on the rise in recent times.
The possible pathophysiology behind the enterolithiasis is the stasis of digestive juices and food particles between the strictures.
Most of the previously reported cases related to enterolithiasis are of cholelithiasis, nephrolithiasis, and Crohn's disease.
As reported in previous studies, the prevelance of primary and secondary enterolithiasis ranges between 0.3% and 10%.
Kelly, "Small bowel obstruction and perforation secondary to primary enterolithiasis in a patient with jejunal diverticulosis," BMJ Case Reports, vol.
Primary small-bowel enterolithiasis," New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
Euphrat, "Radiological significance of primary enterolithiasis," Radiology, vol.