enterohepatic

enterohepatic

(ĕn″tĕr-ō-hĕ-păt′ĭk) [″ + hepar, liver]
Pert. to the intestines and liver.
References in periodicals archive ?
It cannot be ruled out that the enterohepatic cycling kinetics of BPA may have been modified by the fact that the animals had not been fed during the experiment.
Reabsorption completes the enterohepatic cycle and the repeated enterohepatic cycling leads to long half-lives of persistent OCs in the human body.
Toxins that circulate systemically were thought to enter the small intestine with bile and become bound by CSM, thereby interrupting enterohepatic recirculation and preventing systemic recirculation.
With parenteral administration, intramuscular (IM) is the preferred approach because it increases the bioavailability of the drug, acts more quickly than the enteric route, and can be administered when enteric administration is impossible (e.g., in cases of vomiting, an uncooperative or unconscious patient, etc.).1,2 In this method of administration, drugs are often administered into the deltoid or gluteal muscles, which is the commonly selected region thanks to safety, ease of application, less pain compared to the deltoid site, and more volume of drug delivered.1,3 Medication injected into the gluteal region is absorbed almost completely and reaches the target site through the vena cava inferior without entering the enterohepatic cycle.
The Sterolbiome--The Essential, But Overlooked Enterohepatic Endocrine System
Helicobacter cinaedi is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped enterohepatic bacillus found in the digestive tracts of humans and other animals (1).
The portosystemic shunt disrupts the enterohepatic circulation with deranged metabolism of various substances, leading to adverse clinical manifestations.
Other theories include the possibility that carbapenems may limit oral VPA absorption, decrease VPA enterohepatic recirculation, and increase VPA metabolism.
This occurs through a process called "enterohepatic reutilization" and prevents a daily loss of taurine in the feces.
In normal physiology, bile is conjugated by the liver and is transported through the enterohepatic system, where it emulsifies ingested fats for nutrient absorption.
Hyperbilirubinemia is caused both by increased production of bilirubin, as the heme in red blood cells is broken down and by decreased bilirubin excretion due to inadequate hepatic conjugation and increased enterohepatic reabsorption.