enterococcus


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Related to enterococcus: Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium

Enterococcus

 [en″ter-o-kok´us]
a genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria of the family Streptococcaceae, formerly classified in the genus Streptococcus.E. faeca´lis and E. fae´cium are normal inhabitants of the human intestinal tract that occasionally cause urinary tract infections, infective endocarditis, and bacteremia; E. a´vium is found primarily in the feces of chickens and may be associated with appendicitis, otitis, and brain abscesses in humans.

enterococcus

 [en″ter-o-kok´us] (pl. enterococ´ci) (Gr.)
an organism belonging to the genus Enterococcus.

Enterococcus

(en'tĕr-ō-kok'ŭs),
Genus of facultatively anaerobic, generally nonmotile, non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacteria (family Streptococcaceae), formerly classified as part of the genus Streptococcus. Found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, enterococci cause intraabdominal, wound, and urinary tract infections. Type species is E. faecalis. E. faecium is also clinically significant, because of its propensity to develop antibiotic resistance.

en·ter·o·coc·cus

, pl.

en·ter·o·coc·ci

(en'tĕr-ō-kok'ŭs, -kok'sī), Avoid the mispronunciation en-ter-ō-kok'ī of the plural of this word.
A streptococcus that inhabits the intestinal tract.
[entero- + G. kokkos, a berry]

enterococcus

/en·tero·coc·cus/ (en″ter-o-kok´us) pl. enterococ´ci   an organism belonging to the genus Enterococcus.

Enterococcus

/En·tero·coc·cus/ (en″ter-o-kok´us) a genus of gram-positive facultatively anaerobic cocci of the family Streptococcaceae; E. faeca´lis and E. fae´cium are normal inhabitants of the human intestinal tract that occasionally cause urinary tract infections, infective endocarditis, and bacteremia; E. a´vium is found primarily in the feces of chickens and may be associated with appendicitis, otitis, and brain abscesses in humans.

enterococcus

(ĕn′tə-rō-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. entero·cocci (-kŏk′sī′, -kŏk′ī′)
A usually nonpathogenic streptococcus that inhabits the intestine.

en′ter·o·coc′cal adj.

Enterococcus

[en′terokok′us] pl. enterococci
Etymology: Gk, enteron + kokkos, berry
a genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria of the family Streptococcaceae, formerly classified in the genus Streptococcus. E. faecalis and E. faecium are normal inhabitants of the human intestinal tract that occasionally cause urinary tract infections, infective endocarditis, bacteremia, and life-threatening nosocomial infections (vancomycin-resistant enterococci infection). E. avium is found primarily in the feces of chickens and may be associated with appendicitis, otitis, and brain abscesses in humans.

En·ter·o·coc·cus

(en'ter-ō-kok'ŭs)
Genus of facultatively anaerobic, generally nonmotile, non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacteria. Found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, enterococci cause intraabdominal, wound, and urinary tract infections. Type species is E. faecalis. E. faecium is also clinically significant.

enterococcus

A STREPTOCOCCUS inhabiting the intestine.

enterococcus

(pl. enterococci) BACTERIA of the GENUS Enterococcus. Such bacteria are GRAM POSITIVE, COCCOID and facultative ANAEROBES. The genus was established to accommodate STREPTOCOCCI found in the human and animal INTESTINE, such as Streptococcus faecalis, now Enterococcus faecalis.

en·ter·o·coc·cus

, pl. enterococci (entĕr-ō-kokŭs, -sī) Avoid the mispronunciation en-ter-ō-kok'ī of the plural of this word.
A streptococcus that inhabits the intestinal tract.
[entero- + G. kokkos, a berry]

enterococcus

(en´tərō´kok´əs),
n any
Streptococcus bacterium that inhabits the intestinal tract.

Enterococcus

a group of streptococci, mostly of Lancefield Group D. E. durans (previously Streptococcus durans), E. faecalis (previously S. faecalis) and E. faecium (previously S. faecium) are a cause of avian streptococcosis. Mostly they are found in the feces of animals and may be involved in opportunist infections. E. avium (previously S. avium) is of unknown pathogenicity.

Enterococcus seriolicida
an important pathogen for Japanese yellowtail and rainbow trout. Called also Lactococcus parviae and Streptococcus spp. biovar 1.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical outcomes for patients with bacteremia caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococcus in a level 1 trauma center.
In the late 1930s, Sherman recommended that the term enterococcus be specifically used for the streptococci that grow at both 10 and 45[degrees]C, at pH 9.
Ao considerar os riscos oferecidos a saude dos frequentadores de praias em areas improprias para banho, o presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar as condicoes higienico-sanitarias das praias mais frequentadas no municipio de Sao Luis, nos periodos chuvoso e seco, utilizando os Enterococcus como indicador.
coli and enterococcus bacteria in aseptically collected water samples were determined using membrane filtration methods approved by the EPA (11, 12).
This study was undertaken to determine the range of fecal and non-fecal enterococcus species isolated in the USEPA Method 1600.
Only two of the Enterococcus isolates were linezolid resistant, and eight were intermediate resistant to linezolid, whereas none of the S.
coli resistance rates to levofloxacin remained low across age groups, enterococcus resistance rates climbed with age.
As a consequence, the enterococci were placed in the genus Enterococcus.
ENTEROCOCCUS FAECALIS is a rare cause of respiratory tract and pleural space infections.
And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently found that more than half of the chickens purchased in four states were contaminated with Enterococcus bacteria that were resistant to the antibiotic virginiamycin.
coli, enterococcus and total coliform once a month from June through September.
Critical Issues in Infection Control: Focusing on VRI and MRSA in Long Term Care Settings answers the most common and controversial questions that medical directors and administrators have about Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).