enterococcus


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Enterococcus

 [en″ter-o-kok´us]
a genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria of the family Streptococcaceae, formerly classified in the genus Streptococcus.E. faeca´lis and E. fae´cium are normal inhabitants of the human intestinal tract that occasionally cause urinary tract infections, infective endocarditis, and bacteremia; E. a´vium is found primarily in the feces of chickens and may be associated with appendicitis, otitis, and brain abscesses in humans.

enterococcus

 [en″ter-o-kok´us] (pl. enterococ´ci) (Gr.)
an organism belonging to the genus Enterococcus.

Enterococcus

(en'tĕr-ō-kok'ŭs),
Genus of facultatively anaerobic, generally nonmotile, non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacteria (family Streptococcaceae), formerly classified as part of the genus Streptococcus. Found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, enterococci cause intraabdominal, wound, and urinary tract infections. Type species is E. faecalis. E. faecium is also clinically significant, because of its propensity to develop antibiotic resistance.

en·ter·o·coc·cus

, pl.

en·ter·o·coc·ci

(en'tĕr-ō-kok'ŭs, -kok'sī), Avoid the mispronunciation en-ter-ō-kok'ī of the plural of this word.
A streptococcus that inhabits the intestinal tract.
[entero- + G. kokkos, a berry]

enterococcus

/en·tero·coc·cus/ (en″ter-o-kok´us) pl. enterococ´ci   an organism belonging to the genus Enterococcus.

Enterococcus

/En·tero·coc·cus/ (en″ter-o-kok´us) a genus of gram-positive facultatively anaerobic cocci of the family Streptococcaceae; E. faeca´lis and E. fae´cium are normal inhabitants of the human intestinal tract that occasionally cause urinary tract infections, infective endocarditis, and bacteremia; E. a´vium is found primarily in the feces of chickens and may be associated with appendicitis, otitis, and brain abscesses in humans.

enterococcus

(ĕn′tə-rō-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. entero·cocci (-kŏk′sī′, -kŏk′ī′)
A usually nonpathogenic streptococcus that inhabits the intestine.

en′ter·o·coc′cal adj.

Enterococcus

[en′terokok′us] pl. enterococci
Etymology: Gk, enteron + kokkos, berry
a genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria of the family Streptococcaceae, formerly classified in the genus Streptococcus. E. faecalis and E. faecium are normal inhabitants of the human intestinal tract that occasionally cause urinary tract infections, infective endocarditis, bacteremia, and life-threatening nosocomial infections (vancomycin-resistant enterococci infection). E. avium is found primarily in the feces of chickens and may be associated with appendicitis, otitis, and brain abscesses in humans.

En·ter·o·coc·cus

(en'ter-ō-kok'ŭs)
Genus of facultatively anaerobic, generally nonmotile, non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacteria. Found in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, enterococci cause intraabdominal, wound, and urinary tract infections. Type species is E. faecalis. E. faecium is also clinically significant.

enterococcus

A STREPTOCOCCUS inhabiting the intestine.

enterococcus

(pl. enterococci) BACTERIA of the GENUS Enterococcus. Such bacteria are GRAM POSITIVE, COCCOID and facultative ANAEROBES. The genus was established to accommodate STREPTOCOCCI found in the human and animal INTESTINE, such as Streptococcus faecalis, now Enterococcus faecalis.

en·ter·o·coc·cus

, pl. enterococci (entĕr-ō-kokŭs, -sī) Avoid the mispronunciation en-ter-ō-kok'ī of the plural of this word.
A streptococcus that inhabits the intestinal tract.
[entero- + G. kokkos, a berry]

enterococcus

(en´tərō´kok´əs),
n any
Streptococcus bacterium that inhabits the intestinal tract.

Enterococcus

a group of streptococci, mostly of Lancefield Group D. E. durans (previously Streptococcus durans), E. faecalis (previously S. faecalis) and E. faecium (previously S. faecium) are a cause of avian streptococcosis. Mostly they are found in the feces of animals and may be involved in opportunist infections. E. avium (previously S. avium) is of unknown pathogenicity.

Enterococcus seriolicida
an important pathogen for Japanese yellowtail and rainbow trout. Called also Lactococcus parviae and Streptococcus spp. biovar 1.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of what we know about Enterococcus comes from the few strains circulating in the hospital," says Lebreton.
Emergence of CC17 Enterococcus faecium: from commensal to hospital-adapted pathogen.
The fosfomycin resistance gene fosB3 is located on a transferable, extrachromosomal circular intermediate in clinical Enterococcus faecium isolates.
Colonisation with vancomycin-and linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a university hospital: molecular epidemiology and risk factor analysis.
High level of gentamicin resistance (HLGR) among enterococcus strains isolated from clinical specimens.
According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information NCBI Enterococcus, Staphylococcus, Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas andEnterobacter, which known as the riskiest superbugs, have high number of plasmids (Table 2).
Occurrence of virulence factors and antibiotic resistances in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium collected from dairy and human samples in North Italy.
The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Enterococcus Faecium Infections
Although, more than one dozen species of Enterococcus have been identified, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium account for approximately 85-90% and 5-10% of human enterococcal infections, respectively (Gold, 2001).
1 Laboratory Analysis Epa Method 1600 Enterococcus Cost Each For =6 $26.