entasia

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entasia

 [en-ta´zhah]
a constrictive spasm; tonic spasm.
References in periodicals archive ?
In April, Entasis initiated the ATTACK Phase 3 pivotal clinical trial to evaluate SUL-DUR for the treatment of patients with pneumonia and bloodstream infections caused by carbapenem-resistant A.
Entasis is focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of novel antibacterial products to treat serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.
In Subtrahend, unlike Entasis, the sisal moved away from the wall and directly into the space of the viewer, sharing similarities with Hesse's Untitled (1970; Fig.
Entasis Therapeutics is developing a portfolio of innovative cures for serious drug-resistant bacterial infections.
Opinions differ, but I find it curiously barbaric in design, being in the Tuscan or Roman Doric Order - not an Order much used in Britain, and one which does not employ entasis (the artificial slimming of the column in the centre, to correct the optical illusion of a swelling there, invented by the Greeks and quite essential if the column is not to look mis-shapen).
The 16 articles here cover such diverse topics as the movement toward a visual science of art, spatial organization principles in art, the origin of entasis (illusion, aesthetics or engineering), brain activity and implied motion in abstract paintings, designing visually rich textures, Piranesi and the "infinite prisons," gender's effect on the hemispherical laterality of Rembrandt's portraits, artful visions, visual interest during an aesthetic experience, illusions of movement, a universal model of aesthetic perception, portraits and the recognition of face images, fractal-like image statistics, statistical regularities of art images, disassociating pattern and perceptual differences in oculomotor behavior, and the science and art of autosterograms.
He believes that the refinements in the earlier buildings are an extension of the idea of entasis to other parts of the building.
Or the Lovely Lane Methodist Church in Baltimore (1883), whose burly stone tower tapers expressively like the entasis of a Doric column.
Such ''entasis style'' columns are also seen in ancient Greek architecture.