engorged


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Related to engorged: mastitis, Spanish fly

en·gorged

(en-gōrjd'),
Absolutely filled; distended with fluid.
See also: congested, hyperemic.
[O. Fr. fr. Mediev. L. gorgia, throat, narrow passage, fr. L. gurges, a whirlpool]

engorged

[in·gôrjd′]
Etymology: Fr, engorger, to fill up
distended or swollen with fluids.

en·gorged

(en-gōrjd')
Absolutely filled; distended with fluid.
See also: congested, hyperemic

engorged

distended with fluid

en·gorged

(en-gōrjd')
Absolutely filled; distended with fluid.
References in periodicals archive ?
cearensis showed no direct mortality on engorged females in any of its fractions, but the hexane extract reduced the oviposition (52.
Figure 1B demonstrates the significant inhibition in engorged females' egg laying capacity for CF 6%, when compared to negative control (p < 0.
In nymphal acquisition feeding, 10 engorged nymphs were tested individually, and all were found to be infected with SFTSV; however, only 20% (2/10) of the adults ticks derived from the nymphs were infected with SFTSV (Table 1).
stephensi was monitored for 28 days after the cattle were given ivermectin and sampled blood engorged mosquitoes were kept under observation for 12 days.
Foie gras is produced by force-feeding ducks and geese until they fall ill with hepatic steatosis, which causes the liver to become painfully engorged.
A randy bride of "Frankenhooker," Frank Henenlotter's "Bad Biology" mates a genitally engorged male monster with a blonde babe who has seven sexual organs and a singular case of "permanent sexual arousal.
The authors also pointed out that collecting and testing mosquitoes engorged with the blood of domestic or wild animals could be a valuable tool for veterinary and public health authorities who conduct surveillance for the spread of avian influenza virus.
Slate: Jack Shafer's protrait of the journalist as an engorged ego.
PETA says that foie gras producers force-feed ducks and geese until they contract the disease hepatic steatosis, which makes their livers painfully engorged.
PETA says that foie gras producers force-feeding ducks and geese until they contract the disease hepatic steatosis, which makes their livers painfully engorged.
Blood concentration in the cattle tick (Boophilus microplus) is greatest during the last hours of final feeding when engorged females consumed a concentrated blood meal twice their own weight (Seifert et al.