enfranchisement


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enfranchisement

(en-fran?chiz'ment) [Fr. enfranchir, to free]
A recognized freedom to participate fully in society, such as the right to citizenship and the right to vote.
See: disenfranchisement
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References in periodicals archive ?
We start by looking at the relationships between language and enfranchisement before moving to how we can empirically investigate these relationships through a sociolinguistic approach which focuses on linguistic landscapes.
This said, if there is any brave and interested soul out there, inside or outside Government who has the time and motivation to have a go to get the rules changed, then I still believe that enfranchisement without the requirement to seek citizenship would be sensible, and indeed in line with the President's declaration that he wants to see further democratisation and electoral progress.
He is an enfranchisement and right to manage specialist.
Peers this week agreed an amendment to the Wales Bill to devolve power to the National Assembly to set the voting age for a future referendum on income tax powers after NUS Wales joined other organisations in pushing for the enfranchisement of more young people after their successful participation in the Scottish referendum.
It reads: "The Commission should build in enfranchisement of young people as a key principle and a core value in a devolved administration.
Nothing has it to do with the mass of the people, without whose empowerment and real enfranchisement democracy is not even conceivable; nor could any democracy project worth the name be visualised without this uplift of the disempowered and the disenfranchised.
The author argues that the state of Cameroon has marginalized and neglected the local peoples, and attempts to provide blueprints for the development of the region and enfranchisement of its population.
Their report said: "There are no convincing penal policy arguments in favour of disenfranchisement, but a case has been made that enfranchisement might assist rehabilitation."
He knew that economic opportunity for black South Africans, not just political enfranchisement, was necessary for real, lasting progress--mirroring the raison d'etre of BE.
Seek proper professional advice from a solicitor or surveyor that belongs to the Association of Leasehold Enfranchisement Practitioners (ALEP).
(1) I had been struck by parallels between the contemporary advocates of giving "Indians" fee simple interests in reserve land, (2) and the "enfranchisement" schemes which originated before Confederation, in which male Indians who had attained a certain level of accomplishment would be given interests in reserve land that would eventually ripen into fee simple title and be severed from the reserve; these men would become eligible to vote, and shed their Indian status altogether.
For Saunders, the 1867 Reform Act was an "accidental revolution," a product of contingencies that resulted in a degree of enfranchisement that few had foreseen, that many in Parliament did not want, and that produced far-reaching consequences.