enervation


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enervation

 [en″er-va´shun]
1. lack of nervous energy.
2. removal of a nerve or a section of a nerve.

en·er·va·tion

(en'ĕr-vā'shŭn)
Failure of nerve force; weakening.
[L. enervo, pp. -atus, to enervate, fr. e- priv. + nervus, nerve]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Her best poems play with intimacy, scandal, enervation. They push into odd affective registers while conceptualizing the dynamics of encounter.
Much like the suspended existence in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, Haneke renders the endless present in Time of the Wolf The narrative structure cuts from fractured, synecdochal scenes through which Haneke threads traumatic images of the Holocaust and medieval ruins conveying the enervation of familial and social structures to brief episodes of human cruelty in this new, lawless world.
Bancroft invoked nearly all of the particular indictments that would become standard in American abolitionist literature over the next thirty years, from the induced view that labor was disreputable to the physical impoverishment of the soil, from the threat of slave revolts to the corruption of politics and the enervation of the leader class.
At times, though, it sags beneath the weight of numerous descriptions of regime violence and destruction, her enervation as a first-hand witness and blow-by-blow testimonies of activists and fighters.
[3,7,9] Biopsy, if performed, may show lack of myenteric plexus enervation.
Hope and fear, joy and despair, energy and enervation combine and compete to make the Exegesis an astonishing document, but also, considering the price it extracted from its author, an appalling one.
His technical breakthrough came precisely at the most opportune possible moment, when the enervation and mediocrity of the "genteel poetry" which dominated the American literary scene after Whitman's death had come to be perceived as a pressing and nettlesome difficulty, and when there was a sharp appetite for literary experimentation and renewal.
Alteration in cutaneous sensory innervation during surgery or by trauma has been shown to induce the remission of psoriatic plaques at the site of sensory enervation but not in skin areas with intact sensory innervation.1213 The ability of locally applied capsaicin which depletes neuropeptides from the peripheral nerve endings of afferent C fibers improved psoriatic lesions14 and the pruritus within psoriatic skin lesions.15 Mast cells which are multifactorial immune effectors cells may contribute to the perpetuation of the cutaneous inflammatory process in psoriatic lesions by releasing various mediiators.16 An increased number of mast cells has been detected in lesional psoriatic skin compared with nonlesional or normal human skin.
The poems about Juana la Loca, the Infanta Margarita, and Maria Luisa de Borbon all exhibit characteristics of Spanish Decadentism that go beyond a political transposition, though none of the paintings on which they are modeled are "Decadent." Rather, through his own personal reading of the paintings and from what he claims to infer in the women's faces and poses, Machado's ekphrastic rendering of the portraits reflects the characteristics typically associated with women as the Decadents saw them: neurosis, enervation, and a beautiful paleness on the one hand, and monstrous, dangerous ugliness on the other.
What this might be taken to imply is that boredom in the classic 'Fordist' era mainly concerns bodily fatigue through physical enervation and mental under-stimulation.
Back in Boston, enervation accompanied by desuetude restored to normality, Dimmesdale will cast aside romantic veneration and Satanic impulses in favor of religious devotion, giving up on life in this world for a devoutly assumed life beyond the grave.