enervation


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enervation

 [en″er-va´shun]
1. lack of nervous energy.
2. removal of a nerve or a section of a nerve.

enervation

/en·er·va·tion/ (en″er-va´shun)
1. lack of nervous energy.

enervation

[en′ərvā′shən]
Etymology: L, enervare, to weaken
1 reduction or lack of nervous energy; weakness; lassitude; languor.
2 removal of a complete nerve or a section of nerve.

en·er·va·tion

(en'ĕr-vā'shŭn)
Failure of nerve force; weakening.
[L. enervo, pp. -atus, to enervate, fr. e- priv. + nervus, nerve]

enervation

loss of nerve supply

enervation

1. lack of nervous energy.
2. removal of a nerve or a section of a nerve.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, the enervation threshold may have been crossed sometime during George W.
The IM LU report for Rift Valley Province also seems to reinforce this picture of police enervation.
Succumbing to the unstemmable tide of increasing entropy, world politics is being subsumed by the forces of randomness and enervation, wearing away its order, variety, and dynamism.
Enervation in Sanctuary is paradoxically signaled by a beacon of sexuality: the painted mouth.
8) This enervation is dangerous, because in Spengler's opinion, leads to the fall of the "white race" and the emergence of the "colored races".
2) Zola worked this prevailing mood of political enervation into his depiction of Napoleonic oligarchy, a regime notorious for its illegitimate origin in a coup d'etat, rule by plebiscite, absence of democratic procedure, skill at playing parties and classes off each other, predilection for corruption as the reigning modus operandi, and sophistication in the production of propaganda and state pageantry.
Frankl (1978) called this experience an "existential vacuum," a persistent pattern of psychological enervation in which one experiences life as largely empty and meaningless.
Both the late insertion and ultimate emphasis through climactic positioning in this instance march in step with what is a consistent trend in the composition toward underscoring faith and communion, and their enervation, as at the heart of Pinfold's struggles as both man and artist.
year enervation, the party is pacing itself against its tried and tested causes to see how it functions as a political unit.
One recurrent triumph of death--and occasion of mourning--lies in the enervation of male will by woman.
Tuberculosis' coughing enervation is relevant again - resilient strains of that disease have recently re-emerged worldwide.
Deprived thus of timely counseling, my enervation grew until I took up hunting and found my place in a brotherhood that counts muddy clothes, vehicles and fingernails as badges of honor.