enervate


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enervate

(ĕn′ər-vāt′)
tr.v. ener·vated, ener·vating, ener·vates
Medicine To remove a nerve or part of a nerve.
adj. (ĭ-nûr′vĭt)
Deprived of strength; debilitated.

en′er·va′tion n.
en′er·va′tive adj.
en′er·va′tor n.

enervate

(ĕn′ĕr-vāt)
To make weak or to lessen the vitality of.
References in periodicals archive ?
Happily this will enervate the IMF deal, which now appears to be nailed down as a result of the broad political agreement now secured amongst EgyptAAEs parliamentary
The seven sinners are enervate, fulsome, inchoate, celibate, mitigate, refute and disinterested.
Tenure corrupts, enervates, and dulls higher education.
"The fear is that America will decline not because it overstretches," writes Brooks, "but because it enervates as its leading citizens decide that the pleasures of an oversized kitchen are more satisfying than the conflicts and challenges of patriotic service."
She claims that "the gloom of defeat is thick" in twentieth-century American literature because "American writers tended to end their books and their characters' lives as if there were no better existence for which to struggle." But because Southern black experience is rooted in both "struggle" and "some kind of larger freedom" resulting from such struggle, the black writer is able to overcome the despair which enervates so much modern literature (In Search 5).