suction

(redirected from endotracheal suction)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to endotracheal suction: suction catheter

suction

 [suk´shun]
1. the drawing of a fluid or solid into a space because the pressure inside it is lower than that outside.
2. aspiration of gas or fluid by mechanical means.
post-tussive suction a sucking sound heard over a lung cavity just after a cough.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

suc·tion

(sŭk'shŭn),
The act or process of sucking.
See also: aspiration (1), aspiration (2).
[L. sugo, pp. suctus, to suck]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

suction

(sŭk′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of sucking.
2. A force that causes a fluid or solid to be drawn into an interior space or to adhere to a surface because of the difference between the external and internal pressures.
tr.v. suc·tioned, suc·tioning, suc·tions
1. To draw away or remove by the force of suction: suction fluid from the lungs.
2. To clean or evacuate (a body cavity, for example) by the force of suction.
adj.
1. Creating suction.
2. Operating or operated by suction.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

suction

The removal of a fluid or semifluid substance with a negative pressure device. See Liposuction.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

suction

The application of negative pressure so as to withdraw fluid. Suction may be by syringe or mechanical pump and is often applied through a container which acts both as a trap and as a receptacle.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

suc·tion

(sŭk'shŭn)
The act or process of sucking.
[L. sugo, pp. suctus, to suck]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
There were significant changes from baseline to maximal ICP when nonurgent endotracheal suction and repositioning were performed, but only 4 of 24 children had ICP > 20 mm Hg for more than 5 minutes (median time = 3 minutes) after suction.
Comparison of a closed (trach care MAC) with an open endotracheal suction system in small premature infants.