endotoxin


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Related to endotoxin: endotoxin shock

endotoxin

 [en´do-tok″sin]
a heat-stable toxin associated with the outer membranes of certain gram-negative bacteria, including Brucella, Neisseria, and Vibrio species. Endotoxins are not secreted but are released only when the cells are disrupted; they are less potent and less specific than the exotoxins; and they do not form toxoids. In large quantities they produce hemorrhagic shock and severe diarrhea; smaller amounts cause fever, altered resistance to bacterial infection, leukopenia followed by leukocytosis, and numerous other biologic effects.
Results of endotoxin release. From Copstead, 1995.

en·do·tox·in

(en-dō-tok'sin),
1. A bacterial toxin not freely liberated into the surrounding medium, in contrast to exotoxin.
2. The complex phospholipid-polysaccharide macromolecules that form an integral part of the outer membrane of a variety of relatively avirulent as well as virulent strains of gram-negative bacteria. The toxins are relatively heat stable, are less potent than most exotoxins, are less specific, and do not form toxoids; on injection, they may cause a state of shock and, in smaller doses, fever and leukopenia followed by leukocytosis; they have the capacity of eliciting the Shwartzman and the Sanarelli-Shwartzman phenomena.
Synonym(s): intracellular toxin

endotoxin

/en·do·tox·in/ (en´do-tok″sin) a heat-stable toxin present in the intact bacterial cell but not in cell-free filtrates of cultures of intact bacteria. Endotoxins are lipopolysaccharide complexes that occur in the cell wall; they are pyrogenic and increase capillary permeability.en´dotoxic

endotoxin

(ĕn′dō-tŏk′sən)
n.
A toxin produced by certain bacteria and released upon destruction of the bacterial cell.

en′do·tox′ic adj.

endotoxin

[en′dōtok′sin]
Etymology: Gk, endon + toxikon, poison
a toxin contained in the cell walls of some microorganisms, especially gram-negative bacteria, that is released when the bacterium dies and is broken down in the body. Fever, chills, shock, leukopenia, and a variety of other symptoms result, depending on the particular organism and the condition of the infected person. Compare exotoxin.

endotoxin

Bacterial endotoxin, lipid A Microbiology A heat-stable lipopolysaccharide on the outer coat of gram-negative bacteria–eg, those causing cholera, meningitis, pneumonia, plague, whooping cough, et al Clinical Leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, fever, chills, hemorrhagic shock, dec resistance to infection

en·do·tox·in

(en'dō-tok'sin)
1. A bacterial toxin not freely liberated into the surrounding medium, in contrast to exotoxin.
2. The complex phospholipid-polysaccharide macromolecules that form an integral part of the cell wall of strains of gram-negative bacteria. The toxins may cause a state of shock accompanied by severe diarrhea, and, in smaller doses, fever and leukopenia followed by leukocytosis.
Synonym(s): intracellular toxin.

endotoxin

A poisonous lipopolysaccharide formed in the cell wall of a GRAM-NEGATIVE bacterium by means of which the organism causes its damage to the host. Compare exotoxin.

endotoxin

a poison that is produced by and remains inside a living CELL. It is only released upon disintegration of the organism. An example is the delta-endotoxin produced by the BACTERIUM Bacillus thuringiensis, and active against certain insect larvae. GENES for such toxins have been introduced into plants by GENETIC ENGINEERING with a view to conferring insect resistance upon them.

endotoxin

complex, heat-stable, toxic molecules released by a number of Gram-negative bacteria

endotoxin,

n toxin present in the cell walls of bacteria that is released after the bacteria has died. May cause chills, fever, leukopenia, and shock depending on the bacterial species and the health of the infected person.

en·do·tox·in

(en'dō-tok'sin)
1. A bacterial toxin not freely liberated into the surrounding medium.
2. The complex phospholipid-polysaccharide macromolecules that form an integral part of the cell wall of strains of gram-negative bacteria; may cause shock, severe diarrhea, and fever.
Synonym(s): intracellular toxin.

endotoxin (en´dōtok´sin),

n a nondiffusible lipid polysaccharide-polypeptide complex formed within bacteria (some gram-negative bacilli and others); when released from the destroyed bacterial cells, endotoxin is capable of producing a toxic manifestation within the host.

endotoxin

a heat-stable toxin present in the intact bacterial cell but not in cell-free filtrates of cultures of intact bacteria. It is the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of gram-negative outer membranes. Also called O antigen. It is pyrogenic and increases capillary permeability through stimulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha release.
References in periodicals archive ?
Data Integrity components through WinKQCL[TM] Endotoxin Detection & Analysis Software
The EndoPur offers dialysis clinics an endotoxin barrier with the smallest pore size on the market.
Net absorption of endotoxin via portal-drained viscera = (concentrations of endotoxin in the portal blood - concentrations of endotoxin in the arterial blood) x portal blood flow x 1,000
Notably, the PCT and endotoxin levels of the mixed cultures with one or more isolates were not compared with the four groups described above.
3) This better exposes the lipid molecules to Factor C and leads to an increase in the efficiency of endotoxin detection.
In order to know the site of ruminal endotoxin absorption, a study was carried out in steers and Escherichia coli endotoxin were administered directly into their rumen labeled with 51Cr (4,33).
A trace amount of endotoxin was detected with the laboratory blanks (0.
When the scientists compared concentration fluctuations with weather conditions, they noted that endotoxin concentrations rose with air temperature.
7 endotoxin units [EU]/mL), compared with the control subjects (mean, 3.