endothermy


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endothermy

 [en´do-ther″me]
2. thermal regulation by internal heat production.

endothermy

the ability of an organism to produce sufficient metabolic heat to raise its CORE TEMPERATURE above its surroundings. It may be maintained continually or for limited periods only, such as during activity. See HOMOIOTHERM, POIKILOTHERM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Terrestrial systems act as a test for the role of endothermy in limiting food chain lengths, as endotherm and ectotherm consumers are often more similar in size in those systems (partially controlling for body size as a variable).
Hulbert, "An allometric comparison of the mitochondria of mammalian and reptilian tissues: the implications for the evolution of endothermy," Journal of Comparative Physiology B, vol.
Dickson and Graham (2004) argued that endothermy per se was not required for niche expansion and that other adaptations were necessary to allow for vertical movements below the thermocline.
58 M POSSIBLE ROLE OF KIDNEY CHROMAFFIN CELLS IN CRANIAL ENDOTHERMY IN THE ALBACORE TUNA, Thunnus alalunga H.
A matter of size: an examination of endothermy in insects and terrestrial vertebrates, pp.
It is possible that the branch of reptiles that became mammals transduced sound in this fashion the entire time, and that competition for the function of these three bones did not occur until the advent of endothermy and the subsequent need for more rapid food processing.
To put it another way, a delicate homeothermy could have been maintained alongside a weak endothermy (internal energy expenditure).
Reptilian endothermy: a field study of thermoregulation by brooding diamond pythons.
Digestive adaptations for fueling the cost of endothermy. Science 228, 202-204.
The evolution of endothermy: testing the aerobic capacity model.
However, there is an occasional patient with Crohn's who will bleed from a deep ulcer where the physician can render endothermy, as in an upper-G.I.