endothermy


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endothermy

 [en´do-ther″me]
2. thermal regulation by internal heat production.

endothermy

/en·do·ther·my/ (-ther´me) diathermy.

endothermy

the ability of an organism to produce sufficient metabolic heat to raise its CORE TEMPERATURE above its surroundings. It may be maintained continually or for limited periods only, such as during activity. See HOMOIOTHERM, POIKILOTHERM.

endothermy

References in periodicals archive ?
Given that body size was implicated as the most important driver in aquatic systems (which have larger body size spectra), but not in terrestrial systems, we believe that endothermy may be hierarchically nested within the more overarching role of body size in determining food chain length.
Evolution of endothermy in fish: mapping physiological traits on a molecular phylogeny.
While high blood pressure is correlated with endothermy in birds and mammals, it would also be essential in a large animal with a long neck (as in many dinosaurs) for blood to be delivered to the brain, whatever the metabolism of the animal.
These dormant periods may continue for days or months, and fat deposited during the previous autumn provides the energy essential to maintain basal metabolism and endothermy during these periods (Mugaas et al.
Field studies would be needed to test this hypothesis, but it raises the interesting possibility that the initial selective advantage for reptilian endothermy (shivering thermogenesis) may have been the production of thermally induced modifications of developmental pathways during embryogenesis.
These questions have received particular attention in connection with the evolution of the high BMRs necessary for sustaining endothermy (e.
An ecological benefit of endothermy in tunas is an expanded thermal niche, including exploitation of vertical habitat by skipjack tuna (Block, 1991; Graham and Dickson, 2001).
Their presence in a fossil animal signals endothermy, say the researchers (SN: 5/14/94, p.
Aerobic capacity, comparative method, endurance, evolution of endothermy, genetic correlation, locomotion, maximal aerobic metabolism, metabolism, quantitative genetics, resting metabolism.
Development of endothermy and existence energy expenditure of nestling double-crested cormorants.