Endoscope

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endoscope

 [en´do-skōp]
an instrument used for direct visual inspection of hollow organs or body cavities. Specially designed endoscopes are used for such examinations as bronchoscopy, cystoscopy, gastroscopy, and proctoscopy. Although the design may vary according to the specific use, all endoscopes have similar working elements. The viewing part (scope) may be a hollow metal or fiber tube fitted with a lens system that permits viewing in a variety of directions. There is also a light source, power cord, and power source. Accessories that might be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes include suction tip, tubes, and suction pump; forceps for removal of biopsy tissue or a foreign body; biopsy brushes; an electrode tip for cauterization; as well as a video camera, video monitors, and image recorder.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·do·scope

(en'dō-skōp),
An instrument for the examination or surgical manipulation (for example, biopsy, resection, reconstruction) of the interior of a canal or hollow viscus.
[endo- + G. skopeō, to examine]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

endoscope

(ĕn′də-skōp′)
n.
An instrument for examining visually the interior of a bodily canal or a hollow organ such as the colon, bladder, or stomach.

en′do·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
en′do·scop′ic·al·ly adv.
en·dos′co·py (ĕn-dŏs′kə-pē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

endoscope

A semirigid or flexible device with a long firm coil that is inserted into the region of interest, which has a light source, an optical system for viewing mucosa, camera, and a channel that allows insertion of sampling devices–eg alligator forceps, cup forceps, or curette for obtaining biopsies or surgical instruments to perform simple–minor surgeries. See Needle endosope, Sigmoidoscope, Stereoendoscope.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

en·do·scope

(en'dŏ-skōp)
An instrument for the examination of the interior of a tubular or hollow organ.
[endo- + G. skopeō, to examine]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

endoscope

An internal viewing instrument. Modern endoscopes are steerable, flexible, cylindrical instruments with fibre optics for illumination and viewing and channels to allow washing of the area under view, suction, gas inflation to ease viewing, the taking of BIOPSY specimen and the use of various small operating instruments, including LASERS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Endoscope, endoscopy

An endoscope as used in the field of gastroenterology is a thin flexible tube which uses a lens or miniature camera to view various areas of the gastrointestinal tract. When the procedure is performed to examine certain organs such as the bile ducts or pancreas, the organs are not viewed directly, but rather indirectly through the injection of x-ray dye. The performance of an exam using an endoscope is referred by the general term endoscopy. Diagnosis through biopsies or other means and therapeutic procedures can be done with these instruments.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

endoscope

Instrument designed to examine cavities which are not accessible for direct examination with the eye. It usually incorporates fibre optics to increase the flexibility of the instrument. Examples: a laryngoscope which is introduced through the mouth to examine the larynx; an ophthalmic endoscope to examine the intraocular structures by inserting a fibre optics system through the sclera, as may be used in ocular surgery.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
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Attempts can be made to dislodge the stent distally by balloon traction, or other techniques can be applied.4 We successfully retrieved all the migrated stents by using balloon, basket or Soehendra, either using single technique or combined, according to the location of the stent, aetiology and discretion of the endoscopist.
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(ii) Using the data generated by expert endoscopists to generate a simple automatic machine-based algorithm to help detect dysplasia in patients with BE.
The format of the questionnaire was designed to gather information on the number of endoscopists and the registered qualification (e.g.
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