endoscopic biopsy


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Related to endoscopic biopsy: incisional biopsy

biopsy

 [bi´op-se]
removal and examination, usually microscopic, of tissue from the living body, often to determine whether a tumor is malignant or benign; biopsies are also done for diagnosis of disease processes such as infections.
Technique for endometrial biopsy. Longitudinal strips of the endometrium are sampled using an in-and-out and rotational motion. From Rakel, 2000.
aspiration biopsy one in which tissue is obtained by application of suction through a needle attached to a syringe.
brush biopsy one in which the sample is obtained by a brush with stiff bristles introduced through an endoscope, such as for a tissue sample from an inaccessible place such as the renal pelvis or bronchus.
chorionic villus biopsy chorionic villus sampling.
cone biopsy one in which an inverted cone of tissue is excised, as from the uterine cervix.
endoscopic biopsy removal of tissue by instruments inserted through an endoscope.
excisional biopsy removal of biopsy tissue by surgical cutting, such as a lumpectomy.
fine-needle aspiration biopsy aspiration biopsy using a fine needle. For superficial tissue such as the thyroid, breast, or prostate the needle is unguided, but for deep tissue it must be guided radiologically.
incisional biopsy biopsy of a selected portion of a lesion.
needle biopsy (percutaneous biopsy) one in which tissue is obtained by insertion through the skin of a special type of needle (see biopsy needle).
punch biopsy one in which tissue is obtained by a punch-type instrument.
sentinel node biopsy biopsy of a sentinel node (the first lymph node to receive lymphatic drainage from a malignant tumor). It is identified as follows: a dye and a radioactive substance are injected into the body, which causes certain nodes to “light up” like a sentinel, indicating that they are the most appropriate ones for examination. They are detected by both the light created by the dye and the radioactive substance that is monitored by a gamma camera. If the sentinel nodes do not contain malignant cells, this usually eliminates the need for removal of more distal nodes. Called also intraoperative lymphatic mapping.
shave biopsy biopsy of a skin lesion by excising it with a cut parallel to the surface of the surrounding skin.
stereotactic biopsy biopsy of the brain using a stereotactic technique to locate the biopsy site. This can be done as a minimally invasive surgery technique. The patient's head is held in a special rigid frame so that a probe can be directed into the brain through a small hole in the skull.
sternal biopsy biopsy of bone marrow of the sternum removed by puncture or trephining; see also sternal puncture.

en·do·scop·ic bi·op·sy

biopsy obtained by instruments passed through an endoscope or obtained by a needle introduced under endoscopic guidance.

en·do·scop·ic bi·op·sy

(en'dŏ-skop'ik bī'op-sē)
Biopsy obtained by instruments passed through an endoscope or obtained by a needle introduced under endoscopic guidance.

biopsy

removal and examination, usually microscopic, of tissue from the living body. Biopsies are usually done to determine whether a tumor is malignant or benign; however, a biopsy may be a useful diagnostic aid in other disease processes such as infections.

aspiration biopsy
biopsy in which tissue is obtained by application of suction through a needle attached to a syringe.
bite biopsy
instrumental removal of a fragment of tissue.
bone marrow biopsy
obtaining a sample of bone marrow, usually by needle aspiration, from a long bone, rib or sternum, for cytological examination.
Enlarge picture
Needle aspiration of bone marrow. By permission from Ettinger SJ, Feldman E, Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Saunders, 2004
brush biopsy
removal of cells and tissue fragments using a brush with stiff bristles (introduced through an endoscope). Effective in obtaining tissue samples from inaccessible places such as the renal pelvis.
closed biopsy
one carried out without access through an open incision such as a laparotomy. An example is a percutaneous, fine needle aspirate.
cone biopsy
biopsy in which an inverted cone of tissue is excised, as from the uterine cervix.
cytological biopsy
obtaining specimens of cells by various methods including irrigation of a hollow tube.
biopsy dart
an alternative to immobilization of large and wild animals; a dart which cuts a skin bipsy, then falls out. Limited to use for superficial lesions.
endoscopic biopsy
removal of tissue by appropriate instruments through an endoscope.
excisional biopsy
biopsy of tissue removed from the body by surgical cutting.
exploratory biopsy
a combination of exploratory surgery to determine size and location of a lesion and the taking of a biopsy.
fine needle biopsy
see needle biopsy (below).
hepatic biopsy
may be by transperitoneal incision, more commonly by percutaneous needle or trocar and cannula technique.
incisional biopsy
biopsy of a selected portion of a lesion.
needle biopsy
biopsy in which tissue is obtained by puncture of a tumor, the tissue within the lumen of the needle being detached by rotation, and the needle withdrawn.
punch biopsy
see punch biopsy.
Robson-Heggers biopsy
a procedure for the collection of a piece of tissue from an infected wound in order to determine the extent and the nature of the infection.
sternal biopsy
biopsy of bone marrow of the sternum removed by puncture or trephining (see also sternal puncture).
surface biopsy
sample of cells scraped from the surface of a lesion or obtained by impression smears.
surgical biopsy
one obtained during a surgical procedure.
synovial biopsy
by a needle biopsy technique or through an arthrotomy incision using special forceps for a bite biopsy.
total biopsy
obtained by removal of the entire lesion. May be for therapeutic as well as diagnostic purposes.
ultrasound-guided biopsy
use of ultrasonography to guide the passage of a needle or biopsy instrument into an internal organ or lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the role of anti-tTG antibody in the diagnosis of celiac disease with a hope that the results of the present study may provide a screening or diagnostic tool limiting the need for endoscopic biopsy in children suspected of celiac disease.
Notably, perianal disease and endoscopic biopsy granulomas were independently associated with time to the development of SCD.
In our case, endoscopic biopsy showed caseating granuloma and acid-fast bacilli, and the diagnosis was confirmed by culture.
To demonstrate genome-controlled RT-PCR expression profiling, we analyzed fresh endoscopic biopsy samples from 8 patients undergoing follow-up for intestinal metaplasia of the lower esophagus (Barrett esophagus) (n = 27), and 1-5-year-old archival FFPE surgical specimens of colon carcinoma (n = 20) and healthy colonic mucosa (n = 15).
pylori) based on endoscopic biopsy with the help of special stains in gastritis cases.
They described a new technique to perform endoscopic biopsy in a 75-year-old male with a biliary stricture, which was presumed to be a malignancy, in the hilar region.
Oesophagectomy and Endoscopic Biopsy Specimens were Studied to find out the
442415 Reusable Endoscopic Biopsy Forceps Toothed Cups With Needle 180 Cms Length Of Olympus/Wilson Cook/Boston Microvasive/Fuzinon Brand Only.
sup][7] The sample of endoscopic biopsy or FNA is not enough.
The ultimate diagnosis of sinonasal RMS, specifically the embryonal subtype, was made through a transnasal endoscopic biopsy (figure 2).
Thus, determining the specificity and sensitivity of upper tract endoscopic biopsy for the histopathologic diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma is critical.
Endoscopic biopsy technique for acquiring larger mucosal samples.