endorphin


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endorphin

 [en-dor´fin]
one of a group of opiate-like peptides produced naturally by the body at neural synapses at various points in the central nervous system pathways, where they modulate the transmission of pain perceptions. The term endorphin was coined by combining the words endogenous and morphine. Like morphine, endorphins raise the pain threshold and produce sedation and euphoria; the effects are blocked by naloxone, a narcotic antagonist.

endorphin

/en·dor·phin/ (en-dor´fin) any of three neuropeptides, α-, β-, and γ-endorphins; they are amino acid residues of β-lipotropin that bind to opiate receptors in various areas of the brain and have potent analgesic effect.

endorphin

(ĕn-dôr′fĭn)
n.
Any of a group of peptide hormones that bind to opioid receptors and act as neurotransmitters. Endorphins reduce the sensation of pain and affect emotions.

endorphin

[endôr′fin]
Etymology: Gk, endon + morphe, shape
one of the three groups of endogenous opioid peptides composed of many amino acids, elaborated by the pituitary gland and other brain areas, and acting on the central and the peripheral nervous systems to reduce pain. There are three known, designated alpha, beta, and gamma. Beta-endorphin has been isolated in the brain and in the GI tract and seems to be the most potent of the endorphins. Beta-endorphin is composed of 30 amino acids that are identical to part of the sequence of 91 amino acids of the hormone beta-lipotropin, also produced by the pituitary gland. Behavioral tests indicate that beta-endorphin is a powerful analgesic in humans and animals. Brain-stimulated analgesia in humans releases beta-endorphin into the cerebrospinal fluid. Compare enkephalin.

endorphin

Physiology An endogenous opioid–eg, endorphin, leu-enkephalin, met-enkephalin, dynorphin; each binds to a cognate receptor; endorphins act as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, they are concentrated in the brain and associated with analgesia. See Enkephalin, Neuropeptide, Neurotransmitter, POMC.

en·dor·phin

(ĕn-dōr'fĭn)
A natural substance produced in the brain that binds to opioid receptors, thus dulling the perception of pain; postulated to trigger "exercise high," a state of euphoria and exhilaration during intense exercise.

endorphin

a small protein produced in the nervous system of vertebrates exhibiting actions similar to morphine.

endorphin

one of a group of opiate-like peptides produced naturally by the body at neural synapses at various points in the central nervous system pathways where they modulate the transmission of pain perceptions. The term endorphin was coined by combining the words endogenous and morphine. Like morphine, endorphins raise the pain threshold and produce sedation and euphoria; the effects are blocked by naloxone, a narcotic antagonist.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protein contains two amino acids, tryptophan and L-phenylalanine, which also produce endorphins.
For more than a decade scientists have known that the body can manufacture morphine-like natural opiates, known as endorphins.
This UV light-seeking behavior seemed to hinge on endorphins: When people's endorphins were blocked with a different drug called naltrexone, they no longer distinguished between the real and fake tanning beds, a failure that suggests they had become immune to the rewards of UV light.
Q: I've recently been running and often hear about a so-called "runner's high" that has to do with endorphins.
Endorphins are small proteins with opiate-like effects that are produced naturally in the brain.
Sport physiologists say this is a good idea because exercise boosts the body's feel-good chemicals, like serotonin and endorphins, and thereby increases one's natural resilience to the rigours of life.
Nobody has ever reported any brain science suggesting that you get an endorphin rush when you pay your tax bill.
Endorphin Corporation introduces the 240 TRI-CORE Balance and Stabilization Multistation.
A book like this one is like a triathlon workout for the mind--grueling and exhausting, but with a nice endorphin high afterwards.
Feldman's team thought that blocking this endorphin rush might cause such people to lose some of their tanning enthusiasm; what they didn't expect was for some to develop withdrawal symptoms.
By using breathing and relaxation techniques taught in a good childbirth class, a woman can take advantage of her body's endorphin release (natural pain-relieving substances), which will make her labor easier.
It relieves stress and boosts my endorphin levels, making me naturally happy.