endorphin


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endorphin

 [en-dor´fin]
one of a group of opiate-like peptides produced naturally by the body at neural synapses at various points in the central nervous system pathways, where they modulate the transmission of pain perceptions. The term endorphin was coined by combining the words endogenous and morphine. Like morphine, endorphins raise the pain threshold and produce sedation and euphoria; the effects are blocked by naloxone, a narcotic antagonist.

endorphin

(ĕn-dôr′fĭn)
n.
Any of a group of peptide hormones that bind to opioid receptors and act as neurotransmitters. Endorphins reduce the sensation of pain and affect emotions.

endorphin

Physiology An endogenous opioid–eg, endorphin, leu-enkephalin, met-enkephalin, dynorphin; each binds to a cognate receptor; endorphins act as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, they are concentrated in the brain and associated with analgesia. See Enkephalin, Neuropeptide, Neurotransmitter, POMC.

en·dor·phin

(ĕn-dōr'fĭn)
A natural substance produced in the brain that binds to opioid receptors, thus dulling the perception of pain; postulated to trigger "exercise high," a state of euphoria and exhilaration during intense exercise.

endorphin

a small protein produced in the nervous system of vertebrates exhibiting actions similar to morphine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ehrenpries (and other researchers) found that the D-form of phenylalanine slowed down the rate of destruction of endorphin by endorphinase enzymes, dramatically increased endorphin availability, and reduced the need for morphine among post-surgery patients, with no adverse effects.
In addition, the more endorphins released in the orbitofrontal cortex, the greater the feelings of intoxication in the heavy drinkers, but not in the control subjects.
"These are common [opioid drug] withdrawal symptoms," explains Feldman, "and they were bad enough for two subjects to drop out." Although there were no further problems at the 25-mg dose, Feldman says these results suggest that frequent tanners suffer some degree of dependency on endorphins.
The knowledge of how much exercise it takes to stimulate the production of endorphins, their chemical structure and the location of their secretory centers will provide a teleologic clue as to why increased endorphin output (along with monoamines, e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine) contributes to psychophysiologic benefits for the exerciser.
By monitoring chemical activity in brains of people experiencing pain, researchers determined that an the first day of women's menstrual cycles, their bodies produce the least endorphins. How fair is that?
We now know that it is partly due to increased endorphin levels.
During uncontrollable trauma, an increase in endogenous opioids (endorphins) helps to numb the pain of the trauma Following the trauma, however, a rebound endorphin withdrawal can contribute to the symptoms of emotional distress observed after a traumatic event as well as an increased desire to drink alcohol.
Now experiments suggest that the placebo effect may be neurochemical, and that people who respond to a placebo for pain relief-a remarkably consistent 35 percent in any experiment using placebos-are able to tap into their brains' endorphin systems.
LDN blocks opioid receptors for about six hours, during which the body increases its endorphin and encephalin production.
In just a week of the treatment, the mice were seen to have a higher molecule level in their blood called beta endorphin. This hormone is similar to drugs like heroin and opium; they activate pleasure processes in the brain.
"My favourite lift is the deadlift," she claims, "It's the endorphins. It has the highest endorphin to effort ratio!" Polly started lifting regularly just over two years ago.
Enkephalin is an endorphin with similar properties to opium.