endoplasm


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en·do·plasm

(en'dō-plazm),
The inner or medullary part of the cytoplasm, as opposed to the ectoplasm, containing the cell organelles.
Synonym(s): entoplasm
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

endoplasm

(ĕn′də-plăz′əm)
n.
A central, less viscous portion of the cytoplasm that is distinguishable in certain cells, especially motile cells.

en′do·plas′mic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

endoplasm

A conceptualised intracellular compartment based on a primitive understanding of cell biology; endoplasm corresponded to the inner or “medullary” region of the cell and contained “granules”, now known as organelles—e.g., mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, etc.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·do·plasm

(en'dō-plazm)
The inner or medullary part of the cytoplasm, as opposed to the ectoplasm, containing the cell organelles.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

endoplasm

any cytoplasm present within the plasma membrane and ECTOPLASM of a cell. It is often more liquid (see PLASMA SOL than the ectoplasm and is important in locomotion of some PROTOZOANS. It contains more granules than the ectoplasm, from which it is difficult to distinguish, as there is no distinct boundary between the two.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
coli, a commensal in the intestinal tract of humans and pigs, in its trophozoite form has a large eccentric endosome, irregular peripheral chromatin clumping along the nuclear membrane, and endoplasm that may contain ingested bacteria, but not erythrocytes.