endophthalmitis


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Related to endophthalmitis: panophthalmitis

endophthalmitis

 [en″dof-thal-mi´tis]
inflammation of the ocular cavities and their adjacent structures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·doph·thal·mi·tis

(en'dof-thal-mī'tis),
Inflammation of the tissues within the eyeball.
[endo- + G. ophthalmos, eye, + -itis, inflammation]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

endophthalmitis

(ĕn′dŏf-thəl-mī′tĭs, -thăl-, -dŏp-)
n.
Inflammation of the internal structures of the tissues in the eyeball.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

en·doph·thal·mi·tis

, endophthalmia (en'dof-thal-mī'tis, -thalmē-ă)
Inflammation of the tissues within the eyeball.
[endo- + G. ophthalmos, eye, + -itis, inflammation]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

endophthalmitis

Inflammation, usually from infection, within the eyeball. Endophthalmitis, unless vigorously and effectively treated at an early stage with antibiotics, usually leads to blindness.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Endophthalmitis

Inflammation of the eyeball.
Mentioned in: Vitrectomy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

endophthalmitis

Inflammation of the intraocular structures. It can occur after a penetrating wound of the eye (either surgical or accidental), bacterial infection, or intraocular foreign bodies. See panophthalmitis; vitrectomy.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

en·doph·thal·mi·tis

, endophthalmia (en'dof-thal-mī'tis, -thalmē-ă)
Inflammation of the tissues within the eyeball.
[endo- + G. ophthalmos, eye, + -itis, inflammation]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A probable case is defined as ophthalmologist-diagnosed fungal endophthalmitis occurring in a patient who underwent an invasive ophthalmic procedure, including but not limited to vitrectomy, corneal surgery, or intravitreal injections on or after August 23, 2011, the production date of the contaminated BBG lot.
The main 3 mechanisms involved in the induction of endophthalmitis are post-surgical, post-traumatic, and endogenous infection.
Successful treatment of Paecilomyces lilacinus endophthalmitis with voriconazole.
The patient was given a diagnosis of presumptive chronic infectious endophthalmitis and underwent a pars plana vitrectomy and intraocular lens implant removal of the left eye.
There are reports of inducing uveitis, iris cyst, cataract, intralenticular abscess, and endophthalmitis. (6, 10) However, in our patient, the intralenticular cilium resulted in 2+ anterior chamber reaction and simple cortical cataract which was managed efficiently with eye-drops pre-operatively.
He woke in agony the next day, blind in the eye, and returned to the hospital where endogenous endophthalmitis was diagnosed.
After attending the Tysul Eye Unit at Glangwili General Hospital for the next three days, he was diagnosed with sight-threatening condition endogenous endophthalmitis.
Endophthalmitis is a microorganismal infection caused exclusively by bacteria or fungi within the structures of the eye, including the aqueous and vitreous humor.
Objective: To compare the prophylactic use of antibiotic with placebo to prevent post intra-vitreal endophthalmitis and other complications.
Keywords: Endophthalmitis, Ocular trauma, Retinal detachment, Ultrasound B-scan, Vitreous haemorrhage.
Background: Infectious endophthalmitis is a severe ocular inflammation which can cause devastating visual loss.