endometritis


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Related to endometritis: endometriosis

endometritis

 [en″do-me-tri´tis]
inflammation of the endometrium.
puerperal endometritis endometritis following childbirth.
syncytial endometritis a benign tumorlike lesion with infiltration of the uterine wall by large syncytial trophoblastic cells.
tuberculous endometritis inflammation of the endometrium, usually also involving the fallopian tubes, due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with the presence of tubercles.

en·do·me·tri·tis

(en'dō-mē-trī'tis),
Inflammation of the endometrium.
[endometrium + -itis, inflammation]

endometritis

Gynecology Inflammation of the endometrium Etiology Complication of first TM abortion, IUD Clinical Pelvic or lower abdominal pain, rank, funky discharge if infected Management Antibiotics

en·do·me·tri·tis

(en'dō-mē-trī'tis)
Inflammation of the endometrium.
[endometrium + -itis, inflammation]

endometritis

Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, the inner lining of the womb (uterus). This is the result of infection, the most severe form being puerperal endometritis (puerperal sepsis) which sometimes occurs following childbirth. This was once a common cause of death after delivery.

Endometritis

Inflammation of the endometrium or mucous membrane of the uterus.
Mentioned in: Warts
References in periodicals archive ?
<40 years 40-50 years >50 years Diagnosis Biopsy Final Biopsy Final Biopsy Final Carcinoma 0 0 0 0 3 6 Hyperplasia Non-atypical 0 0 2 2 2 2 Atypical 0 0 1 2 1 1 Chronic 0 0 1 0 1 0 endometritis Polyp 1 1 5 3 6 3 Normal Shedding 0 0 6 0 1 0 Proliferative 0 0 2 10 2 4 Secretory 0 0 6 4 0 0 Atrophic 0 0 0 2 3 3 Total 1 23 19 Table 2--Validity of preoperative endometrial pathologic diagnosis in identifying uterine pathology with hysterectomy specimens as reference Standard in women with abnormal uterine bleeding in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia between 2011 and 2015.
Chronic endometritis, a common disease hidden behind endometrial polyps in premenopausal women: first evidence from a case-control study.
Secondary postpartum hemorrhages are less common (incidence rate 1%-2% of deliveries) and may be caused by RPOC, uterine subinvolution, endometritis, acquired or congenital coagulopathies or abnormalities of the uterine vasculature.
First, we determined the relationships between FSC and variables (farm, cow parity [1,2, 3, or [greater than or equal to] 4], BCS at 1 month postpartum [[greater than or equal to] 2.75 vs <2.75] and first AI [[greater than or equal to] 3.0 vs <3.0], detection of a CL within 1 month of calving, year, AI season, IDE or timed AI, peri- and postpartum disorders [dystocia, retained placenta, septicemic metritis, clinical endometritis, ketosis, milk fever, and abomasal displacement], and calving to first AI interval) by performing univariate analysis.
White side test was performed on estrual mucus to confirm endometritis. All animals selected in the study were positive for WST.
The most common cause of bleeding in the post menopausal women was endometrial hyperplasia which is 48% followed by Chronic Endometritis (25%).
The primary study outcome was postpartum endometritis (puerperal sepsis) at three days postpartum, defined as infection of the female genital tract in which two or more of the following were present: pelvic pain, fever >38.0[degrees]C, abnormal vaginal discharge, and delay in the rate of reduction of the size of the uterus <2 cm/day [5].
We review a case of undifferentiated uterine sarcoma in a postmenopausal woman that initially presented as Clostridium perfringens sepsis, with the source of sepsis being endometritis in the setting of a large, necrotic tumor.
The primary outcome was a composite endpoint of endometritis, wound infection, or other infections occurring up to 6 weeks after the c-section.