opioid

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opioid

 [o´pe-oid]
1. any synthetic narcotic that has opiate-like activities but is not derived from opium.
2. denoting naturally occurring peptides, such as enkephalins, that exert opiate-like effects by interacting with opiate receptors of cell membranes. See also opioid analgesic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd),
Originally, a term denoting synthetic narcotics resembling opiates but increasingly used to refer to both opiates and synthetic narcotics.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

opioid

(ō′pē-oid′)
n.
Any of various compounds that bind to specific receptors in the central nervous system and have analgesic and narcotic effects, including naturally occurring substances such as morphine; synthetic and semisynthetic drugs such as methadone and oxycodone; and certain peptides produced by the body, such as endorphins. Also called opiate.

o′pi·oid′ adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

opioid

adjective Referring to opium-like activity, especially on receptors.
 
noun
(1) A drug that has narcotic effects similar to opium (Papaver somniferum) but is not derived from it.
(2) An endogenous peptide (e.g., endorphin) that acts on opioid receptors.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

opioid

Neurology A pain-attenuating peptide that occurs naturally in the brain, which induces analgesia by mimicking endogenous opioids at opioid receptors in the brain. See Opioid-mediated analgesia system.
Opioids
Agonists The most potent opioid agonists are morphine, meperidine, methadone; other opioids include hydromorphine–Dilaudid®, codeine, oxycodone–Percodan®, propoxyphene–Darvon®
Antagonists Naloxone–Narcan®
Mixed agonsts-antagonists Pentazocine–Talwin® 
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd)
A narcotic substance, either natural or synthetic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Opioid

Any morphine-like synthetic narcotic that produces the same effects as drugs derived from the opium poppy (opiates), such as pain relief, sedation, constipation and respiratory depression.
Mentioned in: Anesthesia, General
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd)
Originally, synthetic narcotics resembling opiates but increasingly used to refer to both opiates and synthetic narcotics.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Another one is gate control theory as induced by the application of electrical stimulation which may be inhibit pain signals to some extent by clear alteration of the nervous system or may be by motivation of inhibitory sensory neurons,20 and/or the indirect impacts of gene aspect by local interference of the electrochemical changes.21 Recent theory proposes that PEMF therapy can perform alteration in the gene aspect the comprising genes of pain courses like endogenous opioids and eicosanoid enzyme courses.22Any of these may be submitted the underlying mechanisms liable for the outcomes of this study.
Inhibiting roles of berberine in gut movement of rodents are related to activation of the endogenous opioid system.
The mechanism involved in this process could be greater density of opioid receptors on neuronal cellular membranes, reduced endogenous opioid release, or even both.
Amit, "Endogenous opioid ligands may mediate stress-induced changes in the affective properties of pain related behavior in rats," Life Sciences, vol.
To evaluate the involvement of endogenous opioid peptides in the antinociceptive effect mediated by aripiprazole, the animals were treated with intraplantar injection of bestatin (400 [micro]g/paw).
This antinociceptive effect may be mediated, at least in part, by the activation of endogenous opioid receptors and/or by the inhibition of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels.
It has been suggested that inhibiting the expression of prepartum NB behaviour in crated sows due to a lack of space or substrates increases endogenous opioids (Zanella et al., 1996; Jarvis et al., 1997), which are known to impede oxytocin secretion during farrowing (Bicknell and Leng, 1982; Douglas et al., 1995).
This suggests that alcohol and opiates have similar pharmacological effects and that alcohol consumption may be modified by manipulating the endogenous opioid system.
This increase was reversed by prior administration of naloxone, suggesting that the analgesia induced by angiotensin II was mediated by endogenous opioid mechanisms.
The placebo effect is driven by the anticipation that pain will be relieved--this activates the endogenous opioid system, causing a powerful analgesic effect.
Opioid drugs are agonists that bind to endogenous opioid receptors and mimic the actions of natural morphine-like ligands.
Allelic and somatic variations in the endogenous opioid system of humans.