endogamy

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endogamy

 [en-dog´ah-me]
1. fertilization by union of separate cells having the same chromatin ancestry.
2. restriction of marriage to persons within the same community. adj., adj endog´amous.

en·dog·a·my

(en-dog'ă-mē),
Reproduction by conjugation between sister cells, the descendants of one original cell.
[endo- + G. gamos, marriage]

endogamy

/en·dog·a·my/ (en-dog´ah-me)
1. fertilization by union of separate cells having the same genetic ancestry.
2. restriction of marriage to persons within the same community.endog´amous

endogamy

(ĕn-dŏg′ə-mē)
n.
1. Anthropology The custom of marrying within a particular social or cultural group in accordance with custom or law.
2. Biology Reproduction by the fusion of gametes of similar ancestry, as in self-pollination or inbreeding.

en·dog′a·mous adj.

endogamy

The marriage of a person to another of his or her same social, economic or cultural group.

en·dog·a·my

(en-dog'ă-mē)
Reproduction by conjugation between sister cells, the descendants of one original cell.
[endo- + G. gamos, marriage]

endogamy

pollination of a flower by another flower on the same plant. Compare EXOGAMY.

endogamy

fertilization by union of separate cells having the same chromatin ancestry.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Cunningham & Menon, supra note 29, we coin the acronym EDISEG to describe such groups (Educationally Deprived, Involuntarily Segregated, Endogamous Groups).
The actions of independence-minded Tamils and Tibetans, therefore, can be viewed as attempts to ward off various policies originating outside their endogamous group that have the ultimate aim of domination and/or assimilation.
18) In the Gambia, the Soninke have a reputation for their endogamous orientation as an ethnic group, and especially for being reluctant to betroth their women outside their familial circles.
The three endogamous groups taken into consideration were Jat Sikhs, Banias and Majhbi Sikhs.
The Pashtun populations of Pakistan, remaining in isolation for centuries are no more restricted to the North-West Pakistan and have substantially expanded in various directions making close endogamous communities.
The distribution of various endogamous and exogamous marriages of our 80 individuals for each generation (GSC, GHP and GWP) is given in Table 01.
One thing we had in common was that, like most of our generation, we were each the product of a religiously endogamous marriage, that is, a marriage between two people of the same religion.
Her approval of endogamous marriage surfaces in Persuasion with Henrietta's marriage to her cousin Charles Hayter, in Sense and Sensibility and Emma as both Elinor and Emma marry their brothers-in-law, and in Mansfield Park with Fanny's marriage to her cousin Edmund.
In traditional Sasak society, endogamous marriage was preferred and was usually prearranged between patri-parallel cousins (Budiwanti, 2000; Grace, 2004).
In Saint Denis about two-thirds of marriages involving at least one Breton-born spouse were geographically endogamous (between two people born in the same department), much higher than the 20 percent proportion among all new-comers to Paris.
Drawing on nineteenth-century anthropologists such as John Ferguson McLennan, particularly the latter's theory of endogamy and exogamy, Michie shows how the heiress complicates the model of heterosexual exchange since she cannot enter into an exogamous marriage in which her wealth exits the group/family but must remain within an endogamous union.
Simplified, Kirch interprets oral histories and archaeology to suggest that a set of traits arose (large national temples, god-kings, endogamous classes, the end of kin-based land holding, conquest warfare) with states first forming in the late 1500s and early 1600s on Hawai'i and Maui.