endocardium


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endocardium

 [en″do-kahr´de-um]
the endothelial lining membrane of the cavities of the heart and the connective tissue bed on which it lies.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·do·car·di·um

, pl.

en·do·car·di·a

(en'dō-kar'dē-ŭm, -ē-ă), [TA]
The innermost tunic of the heart, which includes endothelium and subendothelial connective tissue; in the atrial wall, smooth muscle and numerous elastic fibers also occur.
[endo- + G. kardia, heart]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

endocardium

(ĕn′dō-kär′dē-əm)
n. pl. endocar·dia (-dē-ə)
The thin serous membrane, composed of endothelial tissue, that lines the interior of the heart.

en′do·car′di·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

en·do·car·di·um

, pl. endocardia (en'dō-kahr'dē-ŭm, -ă) [TA]
The innermost tunic of the heart, which includes endothelium and subendothelial connective tissue; in the atrial wall, smooth muscle and numerous elastic fibers also occur.
[endo- + G. kardia, heart]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

endocardium

The heart lining that also covers the heart valves.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

endocardium

the inner lining of the HEART.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Endocardium

The inner wall of the heart muscle, which also covers the heart valves.
Mentioned in: Endocarditis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·do·car·di·um

, pl. endocardia (en'dō-kahr'dē-ŭm, -ă) [TA]
The innermost tunic of the heart.
[endo- + G. kardia, heart]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 4(b) shows the ROI, enclosed in rectangular box in (a), representing left and right ventricle and epicardium and endocardium. Figures 4(c) and 4(e) show the proposed method recovery at reduction factors 3 and 8, respectively.
Among chronic disease of the endocardium decedents, the PMRs for nine occupation categories were significantly above 1.00, but the magnitudes were much less than those observed for ALS and Parkinson's disease; the highest (1.15) was for the legal category.
CMR will show diffuse LGE throughout both ventricles, particularly the subendocardium with a characteristic zebra-stripe appearance of the subendocardial enhancement of the LV and RV endocardium, sparing the mid-wall of the interventricular septum [35].
The initialization steps of the algorithms are similar to the midbrain segmentation and left ventricle's endocardium segmentation.
Recently, associations between cardiac inflammation and atrial fibrillation have been reported [11], and inflammatory cells such as macrophages are recruited across atrial endocardium in atrial fibrillation [12].
Previous studies indicated that myxoma cells arise from remnants of subendocardial vasoformative reserve cells or multipotential primitive mesenchymal cells in the fossa ovalis and surrounding endocardium, which can differentiate into a variety of cell lineages including endothelial, fibroblastic, hematopoietic, glandular, neurogenic, and smooth muscle cells [1-3].
In skin lesions, swollen, clumped, and fragmented elastic fibres and calcium deposits are found in the middle and deep reticular dermis with normal morphology in the papillary dermal layers.10 Similar changes occur in elastic fibres of the blood vessels, Bruch's membrane of the eye, endocardium and other organs.
Because GCM usually has diffuse or multifocal involvement of the endocardium, endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) tends to have a higher diagnostic sensitivity in GCM than in cardiac sarcoidosis (35%) or lymphocytic myocarditis (25%).
Ischemia may result in the dispersion of electrical refractory periods between the endocardium and epicardium, which is a requirement for multiple waves of re-entry.
Furthermore, these bacteria have been isolated from fecal samples of children aged under five years and from other organs such as meninges, peritoneum and endocardium in adults.
The condition is associated with fibrosis of the endocardium (extending into the myocardium) of the right and left ventricles, involving predominantly the apices and inflow regions, resulting in impaired filling of one or both ventricles.