endemic

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endemic

 [en-dem´ik]
present or usually prevalent in a population or geographical area at all times, in contrast to epidemic; the term is used of a disease or agent.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik),
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which the disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations in its frequency over time. Compare: epidemic, sporadic.
Synonym(s): enzootic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

endemic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

endemic

adjective
(1) Referring to the usual prevalence of a given disease or infection in an area or group. Endemic conditions do not exhibit wide fluctuations over time in a defined place.
(2) For microparasites, such as measles, endemic refers to an infection that can persist in a population in the long term without reintroduction from outside.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

endemic

adjective Referring to an infection or condition which doesn't widely fluctuate over time in a defined place, or which persists in a population without being reintroduced from outside
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Present in a community or among a group of people; said of a disease prevailing continually in a region.
Compare: epidemic, sporadic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

endemic

Occurring continuously in a particular population. Literally, ‘among the people’. See also EPIDEMIC and PANDEMIC.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

endemic

(of organisms or disease) having a distribution limited to a particular geographical area such as an island.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Endemic

Natural to or characteristic of a particular place, population, or climate. Threadworm infections are endemic in the tropics.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations.
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The hypothesis of a greater cost of tolerance and resulting trade-offs in competitive ability is, however, gaining recognition as a potentially important driving force in the evolution of edaphic endemism. The integration of molecular phylogenies with descriptive and experimental ecological data reveals that occupation of bare habitats is a precursor for serpentine specialization in Streptanthus and close allies (Cacho & Strauss, 2014) and may be central to soil specialization.
This northwestern Iberian endemism, which is included in the IEAPCL, has its main distribution centre in Galician-Leonese mountains (Sierra del Teleno, Montes Aquilanos, Sierra de la Cabrera, Sierra Segundera and Pena Trevinca massif), where is very frequent.
Historical biogeography and patterns of differentiation within the South American avifauna: areas of endemism. Ornithological Monographs, 36, 49-84.
1985: Historical biogeography and patterns of differentiation within the South American avifauna: areas of endemism. Ornithol.
It is zoogeographically interesting that Tachycixius species show high local endemism in spite of territorial connections, and they spread in Turkey despite of marine barrier.
The tropical paradigm as well as the high diversity encountered in some groups of plants or animals within the humid forests are casting a shadow over the dry forests; there is comparatively little published when relating the actual endemism of dry forests to humid forests.
Herpetofaunal Endemism and Diversity in Tropical Forests of Mt.
The generally low similarity coefficients between different Saucrorthis Faunas of different localities and regions, and between all Darriwilian shelly faunas indicate that the diversity acmes of the GOBE were always manifested by (a) the flourishing of local or regional faunas and (b) strong endemism or provincialism in the epeiric seas during the Ordovician.
The senior researcher emphasised that now endemism ( occurrence) pattern and conservation requirements of these amphibians need to be looked into.
Consequently, conservation planning has primarily focused on representativeness, rarity, and endemism of species (Roberts et al., 2003).