endemic

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Related to endemics: Endemic species

endemic

 [en-dem´ik]
present or usually prevalent in a population or geographical area at all times, in contrast to epidemic; the term is used of a disease or agent.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik),
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which the disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations in its frequency over time. Compare: epidemic, sporadic.
Synonym(s): enzootic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemic

adjective
(1) Referring to the usual prevalence of a given disease or infection in an area or group. Endemic conditions do not exhibit wide fluctuations over time in a defined place.
(2) For microparasites, such as measles, endemic refers to an infection that can persist in a population in the long term without reintroduction from outside.

endemic

adjective Referring to an infection or condition which doesn't widely fluctuate over time in a defined place, or which persists in a population without being reintroduced from outside

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Present in a community or among a group of people; said of a disease prevailing continually in a region.
Compare: epidemic, sporadic
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]

endemic

Occurring continuously in a particular population. Literally, ‘among the people’. See also EPIDEMIC and PANDEMIC.

endemic

(of organisms or disease) having a distribution limited to a particular geographical area such as an island.

Endemic

Natural to or characteristic of a particular place, population, or climate. Threadworm infections are endemic in the tropics.

en·dem·ic

(en-dem'ik)
Denoting a temporal pattern of disease occurrence in a population in which disease occurs with predictable regularity with only relatively minor fluctations.
[G. endēmos, native, fr. en, in, + dēmos, the people]
References in periodicals archive ?
The herbarium data and literature reviews allowed us to record the distribution of the endemic species for each of the 22 island grouping (Appendix 1).
Our review showed that the Bahamian archipelago has 89 endemic seed plant species in 54 genera and 29 families (Appendix 1, Fig.
From a historical perspective the majority of the endemic Bahamian species (51) were described and published in two main periods: 1900-1909 (30 species) and 1970-1979 (21 species) (Fig.
Members of this cluster have a reduced number of endemic species and confirm a widespread pattern of other insular systems in which an increase in species and endemism diversity only starts to occur above a particular threshold area (i.e., the small-island effect) (Whittaker & Fernandez-Palacios, 2007).
For conservation purposes, these results suggest that large serpentine patches are the most effective places to conserve serpentine endemics, since compared to small patches they have an equal regional diversity and often a higher local diversity of endemic herbs, and are less invaded by exotic species.
To analyze further the effects of calcium, the local diversity of endemic species was regressed separately on calcium level for patches and continuous sites.
For the specialist (endemic) species, small patches may have low diversity because of low rates of colonization and high rates of local extinction, and, for the same reason, endemic diversity can be higher on large outcrops.
Second, herb diversity was influenced by variation in soil calcium, in opposite directions for native and endemic species.
Other tribes without endemic genera in the Antilles are the Anthemideae, Astereae, Gnaphalieae, Helenieae, and Liabeae.
The monotypic tribe Feddeeae is endemic to Cuba, and is sister to the Heliantheae sensu lato group; Feddea belongs to this endemic tribe (Cariaga et al., 2008; see further discussion below).
The Caribbean Islands not only harbor an endemic tribe and the highest number of endemic genera among insular systems worldwide, but their genera have a broader cladistic sampling, as they are accommodated among 12 of the 36 major lineages of the tree of life of the Asteraceae.
The Astereae and Gnaphalieae are the only tribes with a relatively large number of genera endemic to insular systems (22 in the Astereae and nine in the Gnaphalieae) that do not have any genus endemic to the Caribbean Islands (Bayer et al., 2007; Nesom & Robinson, 2007).