end of life


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end of life

Cardiac pacing
noun The point at which a pacemaker signals a need for replacement, as its battery is nearing depletion.
 
Medspeak
adjective Referring to a final period (hours, days, weeks, months) in a person’s life, in which it is medically obvious that death is imminent or a terminal moribund state cannot be prevented. As in, end-of-life care.

End-of-life care—making decisions 
Initiate discussion: 
• Establish supportive doctor-patient relationship;
• Designate surrogate decision maker;
• Identify patient’s general preferences.
Clarify prognosis: 
• Keep message clear, avoid misunderstanding;
• Acknowledge prognostic limitations.
Identify end-of-life goals: 
• Determine if preferences have changed;
• Identify individual priorities.
Develop treatment plan: 
• Help patient understand treatment options;
• Discuss resuscitation;
• Discuss palliative care.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lynn Parry, general manager at Hospice at Home Gwynedd and Anglesey added: "As hospices committed to improving end of life care services for the whole population of Gwynedd, Anglesey and Conwy we are determined to improve this situation and make a significant contribution to provide an equitable service for all.
We are keen to see as many organisations as possible working together, nationally and locally, to ensure we can provide the very best of care at all hours for people who are reaching end of life.
Nursing has traditionally played a critical role in facilitating not just the care of patients at end of life, but providing them with the necessary emotional support to make difficult end of life decisions with a respect for persons across the life span and to do no harm.
Nurses have an obligation to provide humane, comprehensive, and compassionate care that respects the rights of patients but upholds the standards of the profession in the presence of chronic, debilitating illness and at end of life."
An independent review has recommended the Liverpool Care Pathway, a national policy which currently sets out how all hospitals should treat people at the end of their lives, should be phased out over the next year, to be replaced by personalised end of life care plans.
The terms palliative, end of life, and hospice are often used interchangeably and the author offers current definitions for each term with an emphasis on how palliative care can be delivered alongside active, curative treatment and is focused on providing comfort throughout the disease trajectory.
For example, restrictions on a patient's ability to participate in activities and disengagement from some areas of interest are common among individuals facing the end of life, but if a patient is unable to find pleasure in any event or activity, he or she may meet criteria for depression.
End of life care is increasingly part of the national conversation as more than 70 million baby boomers approach the end of their life spans.
However, we do not regularly have specific nurses as we do in specialized areas such as cardiac and oncology who are experts in the processes at the end of life to attend to the patient and family when the sacred cycle of transitioning from living to dying occurs.
The American Nurses Association's (ANA) Position Paper (2010) on the nurse's roles and responsibilities in providing end of life care also states that assisting in euthanasia is not permissible.
This SALC Report ('Euthanasia and the artificial preservation of life, Project 86') included a draft bill, titled End of Life Decisions Act 1998, and was tabled in Parliament in 2000, but was shelved by the then Minister of Health Dr M Tshabalala-Msimang.
We must ask ourselves: Do we help people experience the end of life in a way that brings closure and maturity?