enculturation


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enculturation

(ĕn-kŭl′tū-rā′shŭn)
The adjustment of a person to the norms and values of his community.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dans son parcours transformateur, l'eleve s'adapte egalement a la culture de reference, ce qui correspond au phenomene de l'enculturation. Ce parcours se poursuit dans le temps (ce que montre la fleche du schema de la figure 3).
And enculturation requires more work for faculty at a time when the education systems are finding ways to achieve efficiencies through larger class sizes and more online programming.
Moir has discussed various stages of teacher enculturation process and teachers' adjustment to the two distinct but related dimensions: occupational socialization and organizational socialization (Moir, 1999).
It emphasizes dimensions of enculturation and dependence upon parents in children's media consumption and how these have been understood and discussed in the Scandinavian public.
--According to the most of respondents based on non-existence of technical and communicational infrastructure for offering electronic banking (that may be the result of lack of their awareness from the last changes in the country in this field), it is suggested the related institutions such as Ministry of Information and Technology, banks and telecommunication corporations more introduce it and enculturation to teach and use of these facilities is done.
"Queer Rhetoric and the Pleasures of the Archive." Enculturation (2012).
* On-boarding and enculturation of all new physician colleagues
The enculturation process administered by various social institutions had instilled in the majority of Saudis the Islamic values, such as unity, fairness, equality, compassion and other humanistic values.
It became evident that medical education essentially consists in moral enculturation, which entails the transmission of a distinctive medical morality.
After presenting some thoughts on preliminary definitions and a historical overview of how military doctrine has been conceived since the end of the 19th century, the author theorizes the philosophical, methodological, and epistemological foundations of military doctrine in chapters that address doctrinal foundationalism, doctrinal coherentism, enculturation, and authority.

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