encrust


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encrust

, incrust (in-krŭst′) [L. incrustare, to cover with a rind or crust]
To coat with a crust of debris, e.g., of lipids, proteins, salts, slime, or sugars.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3,4) Especially in the presence of encrusted intrarenal segment of DJS, the use of PCNL and open procedures has been frequently reported.
It will be encrusted with diamonds - and will cost up to pounds 60,000.
Fashioned in solid sterling silver, the whistle is encrusted with pounds 1200 worth of gems.
The second watch, a gold and diamond encrusted Rolex, is valued at pounds 35,000.
Crabcakes with Creole remoulade sauce Sashimi-sesame encrusted yellowfin tuna with wasabi
Scott, 37, had secretly proposed to Barbara on her birthday and gave her a platinum engagement ring encrusted with five large diamonds.
But externally, it is 'encrusted' - to use another Ruskinian term - with white masonry and dark grey/green courses, joined with stainless-steel bosses, the equivalent of the visible fastenings used in the cladding of Italian buildings, which Ruskin called 'confessed rivets'.
Summary: DUBAI - Pure Gold Jewellers has launched Pure Silver, an eclectic collection of trendy silver jewellery encrusted with diamonds available in time for the Dubai Shopping Festival celebrations.
SPARKLING Singer dazzles in a leotard encrusted with gems RICH MOVER Cheryl performing her pounds 6,285-a-minute show
References unite figures as diverse as da Vinci and de Kooning; his paint handling varies from the thin to the encrusted, with images left suggestively inchoate or wrenched away from their sources.
A BRIGHT pink car encrusted with diamonds and worth more than $1m could only be the creation of Merthyr Tydfil fashion designer Julien MacDonald.
On the street, the white stone box within the more heavily encrusted surroundings already signals the presence of a contemporary wall.