enamel hypoplasia


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e·nam·el hy·po·pla·si·a

a developmental disturbance of teeth characterized by deficient or defective enamel matrix formation; may be hereditary, as in amelogenesis imperfecta, or acquired, as encountered in dental fluorosis, local infection, childhood fevers, and congenital syphilis.

enamel hypoplasia

a defect in which the enamel of the teeth is hard but thin and deficient in amount as a result of defective enamel matrix formation with a shortage of the cementing substance. It is characterized by lack of contact between teeth, rapid breakdown of occlusal surfaces, and a yellowish-brown stain that appears where the dentin is exposed. The condition affects both primary and secondary dentition. It is transmitted genetically or caused by environmental factors such as vitamin A, C, or D deficiency; fluorosis; rash-producing childhood diseases; congenital syphilis; injury or trauma to the mouth; or administration of tetracyclines during the second half of pregnancy or during early tooth development. Compare enamel hypocalcification. See also amelogenesis imperfecta.
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Enamel hypoplasia

e·nam·el hy·po·pla·si·a

(ĕ-nam'ĕl hī'pō-plā'zē-ă)
A disturbance in the developing ameloblasts during enamel matrix formation resulting in a pitted surface of the crown.
See also: enamel hypocalcification, fluorosis

e·nam·el hy·po·pla·si·a

(ĕ-nam'ĕl hī'pō-plā'zē-ă)
Developmental disturbance of teeth characterized by deficient or defective enamel matrix formation.

enamel

the white, compact and very hard substance covering and protecting the dentine of the crown of a tooth.

enamel bulge
the area of greatest diameter of a tooth, just external to the gum line, which acts to deflect food from the free gingival margin and the gingival crevice.
enamel epithelium
epithelium which creates a bell-shaped enamel organ, surrounding the dental papilla; the internal epithelium consists of columnar ameloblasts which secrete enamel.
enamel hypoplasia
incomplete or partial development; a common defect in dogs.
inherited enamel defect
an inherited absence of enamel from all teeth combined with excessive flexibility of joints in Holstein-Friesian cattle. The teeth are pink and obviously deficient in substance. A defect in collagen formation is probable.
enamel layer
the outermost layer of cells of the enamel organ.
mottled enamel
dental fluorosis; defective enamel, with a chalky white appearance or brownish stain, caused by excessive amounts of fluorine in drinking water and food preparations during the period of enamel calcification.
enamel organ
an epithelial cap over a dental papilla that develops into the enamel-producing organ. The shape of the enamel organ determines the shape of the tooth.
enamel points
sharp projections of enamel at the junction of the buccal and occlusal surfaces of a tooth. Seen most commonly in horses.
enamel rods
progressively mineralized glycoproteinaceous tubules, the basic structural units of enamel; enamel is acellular and consists of interrod material and rods,
enamel spot
remnant of the enamel cup in the center of an incisor tooth table in a horse.
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Enamel spot. By permission from Sack W, Wensing CJG, Dyce KM, Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, Saunders, 2002
enamel works
factories manufacturing enamels or using them extensively; sources of fluorine for pollution of pasture and water.
References in periodicals archive ?
Linear enamel hypoplasia in gibbons (Hylobateslarcarpenteri).
Although fluorosis opacity and enamel hypoplasia have been reported in Colombia, few epidemiological studies have assessed their magnitude in the geographical area of the city of Pasto.
Due to the ring-like nature of enamel development and the lack of enamel remodeling throughout the life of the organism, the location of enamel hypoplasia bands can indicate the approximate age of an individual at the time the physiological stressor occurred.
While the exact mechanism of action of how fluoride causes enamel mottling remains unknown, it is well-recognized that with increased amounts of fluoride concentrations in the drinking water, the resultant enamel hypoplasia becomes progressively evident, as increased fluoride levels interfere with ameloblastic function, which adversely affects both enamel matrix formation and enamel matrix calcification.
The enamel hypoplasia data is complicated by the high rate of antemortem tooth loss in the Atacama.
Gillespie 1974 "An epidemiologic study of linear enamel hypoplasia of deciduous anterior teeth in Guatemalan children", Arch.
mutans), frequent nursing and snacking, the presence of enamel hypoplasia, and prenatal and perinatal histories.
Trauma Trauma during tooth development may cause severe enamel hypoplasia or dilaceration of the teeth.
Hyperbilirubinemia can cause kernicterus, a preventable brain injury that involves permanent brain damage and other complications that may include cerebral palsy, auditory neuropathy, gaze abnormalities, and dental enamel hypoplasia.
in their study noted the prevalence of enamel hypoplasia in deciduous canine as 4.
Prenatal and neonatal variables associated with enamel hypoplasia in deciduous teeth in low birth weight preterm infants.