empiricism

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Related to empiricist: rationalism

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm),
A looking to experience as a guide to practice or to the therapeutic use of any remedy.

empiricism

/em·pir·i·cism/ (em-pir´ĭ-sizm) skill or knowledge based entirely on experience.empir´icempir´ical

empiricism

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

[empir′isiz′əm]
a form of therapy based on the therapist's personal experience and that of other practitioners. empiricist, n.

empiricism,

n philosophical school in which theories must be based upon repeatable observations. Modern science has empiricism as its philosophical foundation.

empiricism

The belief that knowledge or behaviour stems from experience, learning or data acquired by observation or experimentation. See nativism; empiricist theory.

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm)
Using experience as a guide to practice or use of any remedy.

empiricism

skill or knowledge based entirely on experience; compare with rationalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
41) As promised, this strategy has common features with our diagnosis of the failure of the Semantic Empiricist argument, and I'll attempt to show that it responds not only to Epistemological Empiricism but to the two Constructivist challenges as well.
Finally, how are we to assess the contest between the empiricist and transcendentalist views?
If the candidate is "harming others is wrong," the empiricist first begins by pointing out that there are qualified and unqualified versions of this proposition.
Isaacson notes that Quine's main argument against the analytic-synthetic distinction is the holistic nature of knowledge (it could not be established on an empiricist basis).
Empiricist scholars assert that our claims to knowledge are constrained by our ability to justify the claims by experience only.
In this vein, Krupp's analysis of Locke's theory of language culminates in the suggestion that Britain's most famous empiricist was in fact an anthropological rationalist.
He claims they are "the great English empiricists of the nineteenth century" and offers this description of their similarity:
Guido Adler's relationship to positivism was, if possible, even more troubled than that of either Hanslick or Schenker, as it was he who effectively established the empiricist approach to music in his 1885 lecture "Scope, Method, and Goal of Musicology.
Understandably* however, Watson is a product of a Western empiricist superstructure that, historically, lost confidence in religion--and unfortunately the spiritual too--and threw both away as useless.
Thus while model formulation may seem an attractive skill for an empiricist, it is knowledge of statistical methods that will likely provide more value within the empirical knowledge community.
The error of accepting the given as passively received data is one that "metaphysical philosophies, transcendental philosophies, and empiricist philosophies all fall prey to" (19), transcendental philosophies in particular by deriving the transcendental conditions of experience from lived experience itself.
Drawing on the 19th-century pragmatist and empiricist traditions, social policy research for much of the 20th century was concerned with the collection of "facts" and the evaluation of interventions designed to improve social conditions.