empiricism


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em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm),
A looking to experience as a guide to practice or to the therapeutic use of any remedy.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

empiricism

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

empiricism

The belief that knowledge or behaviour stems from experience, learning or data acquired by observation or experimentation. See nativism; empiricist theory.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm)
Using experience as a guide to practice or use of any remedy.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The first merit of this remarkable defense of empiricism in ethics and economics is its frank status quaestionis and chosen perspective.
If Posner's empiricism is misdirected, is there a better way to use empirical science in constitutional law?
But if we were to hold instead that such external events count as our "sensory evidence", then Quine's position could again accommodate the "two cardinal tenets of empiricism": on this analysis, experience would once more be shareable as well as appealed to in stating the constraints on translation.
But historical specificity -- surely a plausible commitment for someone vindicating "empiricism" -- is not McDonald's strong suit.
The present case studies the effectiveness of utilizing collaborative empiricism for psychological adjustment of client with chronic medical condition.
A commitment to empiricism is also a form of check and balance.
By century's end, empiricism once again asserted itself in English fiction and many writers turned to realism.
Arguably, then, in such a perspective constructive empiricism is safe, as long as it meets the criteria just mentioned (which it does)--and van Fraassen's exact definition or use of the adjective "observable" is of no impact.
Synopsis: In "Aristotle's Empiricism: Experience and Mechanics in the 4th Century B.C.", Jean De Groot argues that an important part of Aristotle's natural philosophy has remained largely unexplored and shows that much of Aristotle's analysis of natural movement is influenced by the logic and concepts of mathematical mechanics that emerged from late Pythagorean thought.
Bennett, Words, Space, and the Audience: The Theatrical Tension Between Empiricism and Rationalism (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), Pages 179.
He surveys recent scholarship on the beginnings of the phenomenological theory, existentialist critiques of Husserl's theory, language-analytic accounts and the new empiricism, computer models and functional explanations, criticisms of the analytic-empirical approach, extensions of the phenomenological theory, and a hybrid project that contains the best of both approaches.