empiric treatment


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treatment

 [trēt´ment]
1. the management and care of a patient; see also care.
2. the combating of a disease or disorder; called also therapy.
Schematic of the treatment planning process using occupational therapy as an example. From Pedretti and Early, 2001.
active treatment treatment directed immediately to the cure of the disease or injury.
causal treatment treatment directed against the cause of a disease.
conservative treatment treatment designed to avoid radical medical therapeutic measures or operative procedures.
empiric treatment treatment by means that experience has proved to be beneficial.
expectant treatment treatment directed toward relief of untoward symptoms, leaving the cure of the disease to natural forces.
extraordinary treatment a type of treatment that is usually highly invasive and might be considered burdensome to the patient; the effort to decide what is extraordinary raises numerous ethical questions.
fever treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of a patient with hyperpyrexia caused by nonenvironmental factors. See also fever.
heat exposure treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of a patient overcome by heat due to excessive environmental heat exposure. See also heat stroke.
hypothermia treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as rewarming and surveillance of a patient whose core body temperature is below 35°C. See also hypothermia.
Kenny treatment a treatment formerly used for poliomyelitis, consisting of wrapping of the back and limbs in hot cloths, followed, after pain has subsided, by passive exercise and instruction of the patient in exercise of the muscles. It was named for Sister Elizabeth Kenny, an Australian nurse known for her care of polio patients during the first half of the 20th century.
neurodevelopmental treatment Bobath method.
palliative treatment supportive care.
preventive treatment prophylaxis.
t's and procedures in the omaha system, a term used at the first level of the intervention scheme defined as technical nursing activities directed toward preventing signs and symptoms, identifying risk factors and early signs and symptoms, and decreasing or alleviating signs and symptoms.
treatment and/or procedure a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action prescribed to cure, relieve, control, or prevent a client problem.
prophylactic treatment prophylaxis.
rape-trauma treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of emotional and physical support immediately following a reported rape.
rational treatment that based upon knowledge of disease and the action of the remedies given.
refusal of treatment see under refusal.
root canal treatment root canal therapy.
specific treatment treatment particularly adapted to the special disease being treated.
substance use treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as supportive care of patient/family members with physical and psychosocial problems associated with the use of alcohol or drugs. See also substance abuse.
substance use treatment: alcohol withdrawal in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the care of the patient experiencing sudden cessation of alcohol consumption. See also alcoholism.
substance use treatment: drug withdrawal in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the care of a patient experiencing drug detoxification. See also substance abuse.
substance use treatment: overdose in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as monitoring, treatment, and emotional support of a patient who has ingested prescription or over-the-counter drugs beyond the therapeutic range. See also overdose.
supporting treatment (supportive treatment) supportive care.

em·pir·ic treat·ment

a treatment based on experience, usually without adequate data to support its use.

em·pir·ic treat·ment

(em-pir'ik trēt'mĕnt)
Therapy based on practical experience, rather than theoretic postulates.

em·pir·ic treat·ment

(em-pir'ik trēt'mĕnt)
Therapy based on experience, usually without adequate data to support its use.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most significant biases of this study was the use of empiric treatment of vancomycin and meropenem for late neonatal sepsis, considering their categorization as wide spectrum and second-line therapies.
The fact that limitation precautions related with antibiotic use are not adequate and consultations with IDSs are rarely made in our hospital is another reason that increases inappropriate antibiotic use in empiric treatment. It is clear that the use of antibiotics according to consultation with the division of infectious diseases is a variable that decreases the frequency of inappropriate antibiotic use.
Early empiric treatment also reduced fungal-related mortality but it did not significantly reduce length of hospital or ICU stay (Table 4).
Finally, we are nearing the end of the line for empiric treatment with reports of rising MIC's for 3rd generation Cephalosporins, the last group of antibiotics known to be effective at clearing N.
For presumed active tuberculosis, empiric treatment should be started before bacteriologic culture confirmation.
Detractors will cite reports of detailed economic analyses that suggest empiric treatment without a metabolic evaluation is more cost-effective than directed therapy after a metabolic evaluation.[sup.7,13] Unfortunately, when empiric therapy proceeds beyond dietary advice and involves the non-selective addition of medications, it is likely that few patients would agree to lifelong therapy without the clinician clearly demonstrating a defined laboratory abnormality.
Cefepime (FEP) and piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) are commonly used alternatives for the [beta]-lactam component of broad-spectrum regimens for empiric treatment of sepsis in the critically ill.
Now available throughout the European Union (EU), physicians suspecting reflux can use this evidence based test and replace empiric treatment using acid suppressing medications.
It should be the initial empiric treatment of this infection because it is effective, safe, and well tolerated.
* Empiric treatment (based on clinical investigations rather than isolation and typing of the causative pathogen) predominates because of the widespread lack of diagnostic services, particularly in developing countries.
The NEJM study notes that infections in nursing homes have generally responded to empiric treatment, without microbiologic confirmation of their cause.
(17) This is of particular concern because macrolides are considered a first-line empiric treatment for CAP.