emotivity


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emotivity

(ē″mō-tĭv′ĭ-tē)
One's capability for emotional response.
References in periodicals archive ?
My doubt is that the emotivity of the socio-political context may cloud the issue of what is being subverted.
Falling in with Freron, who had been mobilized in this fight since the 1750s, Simon-Henri-Nicolas Linguet, and other "anti-philosophes," Gilbert adopted in his writing the characteristic stylings of "counter-Enlightenment" partisans, who combined a sharp sense of marginality within the literary sphere, an exasperated emotivity (plaintive or sarcastic) that articulated both their suffering as pariahs and a spiritualized vision of humanity (against the philosophes' cold rationalism), as well as outrage at the neglect of traditional, religious values of which they professed to be the defenders.
Through interpretive and quantitative approaches, I emphasize that a satisfactory account of referential forms cannot be reached unless one understands how the writer's emotivity plays a part in choosing referential forms.
Ultimately, choosing how to refer to these two vessels is itself a means for conveying emotivity, thus realizing one aspect of the expressive function of language.
Before discussing the specifics of the choice of referential forms, three concepts relevant to the present study should be touched upon, namely expressivity, emotivity, and ideology.
I argue that linguistic devices and strategies in spoken and written Japanese, even those commonly understood not to convey expressive meaning, are imbued with emotivity.
Given that the expressivity and emotivity of language are inherently linked to the society and culture within which the language is situated, the sociocultural dimensions of language are also relevant to the current study.
The study by Hodge and Kress show that ideology is an undeniable force motivating specific phrases that are imbued with different expressivity and emotivity.
In this sense, it is possible to understand that overlapping observations made in this section between article topics and emotive perspectives are resultant of the reporter's desire for realizing a certain expressivity and emotivity.
For vir, the conditions under which it is optional or obligatory and the variables that govern its usage as a direct object marker, such as nominal category, animacy, position of the direct object, emotivity, and style, see Ponelis (1993: 265-272), Raidt (1976), and Donaldson (1993:341-346, 387-388).