emotion

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Related to emotionless: alexithymia

emotion

 [e-mo´shun]
a state of arousal characterized by alteration of feeling tone and by physiologic behavioral changes. The external manifestation of emotion is called affect; a pervasive and sustained emotional state, mood. adj., adj emo´tional. The physical form of emotion may be outward and evident to others, as in crying, laughing, blushing, or a variety of facial expressions. However, emotion is not always reflected in one's appearance and actions even though psychic changes are taking place. Joy, grief, fear, and anger are examples of emotions.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn),
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object and is evidenced in both behavior and in psychological changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion

(ĭ-mō′shən)
n.
1. A mental state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort and is often accompanied by physiological changes; a feeling: the emotions of joy, sorrow, and anger.
2. Such mental states or the qualities that are associated with them, especially in contrast to reason: a decision based on emotion rather than logic.

emotion

Psychology A mood, affect or feeling of any kind–eg, anger, excitement, fear, grief, joy, hatred, love. See Negative emotion, Positive emotion, Toxic emotion.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest directed toward a definite object and evidenced in both behavior and in psychologic changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

emotion

Any state of arousal in response to external events or memories of such events that affect, or threaten to affect, personal advantage. Emotion is never purely mental but is always associated with bodily changes such as the secretion of ADRENALINE and cortisol and their effects. The limbic system and the hypothalamus of the brain are the mediators of emotional expression and feeling. The external expression of emotional content is known as ‘affect’. Repressed emotions are associated with psychosomatic disease. The most important, in this context, are anger, a sense of dependency, and fear.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]

Patient discussion about emotion

Q. Emotions My 68 years-old husband underwent his surgery for lung cancer several moths ago and after that received chemo. Thankfully, it seems that he’s on the right track, but then lately he’s being very emotional. He says he’s always been this way since the diagnosis, but he just hid it. We try to talk about it, but it seems we just don’t communicate. Any advice?

A. Hi,
Those above me already phrased very well what I wanted to write, so I’ll add a link to a site I found about this subject:
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/MBC/MBC_4x_Anxiety.asp?sitearea=MBC

Take care!

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

Q. discussing my father situation with the doctor My 82 years old dad has dementia, and currently lives with us at my home. For the last few weeks he's very nervous and sometimes yells and screams at us. I want to take him to the doctor and see if he can get any help, but I'm afraid that if I'll try to speak with doctor about this subject in front of my dad he'll take offense. What can I do? Thank you very much!

A. The answer above is a good suggestion. I would add to the letter a small warning about the way your father would react to a discussion of his behaviour so the doctor would know to discuss it carefully.

More discussions about emotion
References in periodicals archive ?
Appleby felt Emotionless, who finished last, will be a better horse next year.
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What's important to consider here is the fact that whereas there has long been a criticism of products coming from companies like Toyota as being "emotionless appliances," it is evident that while they're giving nothing up vis-a-vis methodical improvement--after all, kaizen is far from being a random exercise--that they're paying careful attention to the level of engagement that their vehicles can create with customers.
Reader Fields displays an anchorwoman-like straight-forwardness as she reads in a nearly emotionless, journalistic manner, a "this just handed to me" style so appropriate for audio.
Her vision of a feminist cyberethics calls for a more caring, relational approach, in which men's and women's experiences are equally valued, than the individualistic, rationalistic, and often emotionless forms of ethical decision making that are now widespread in technology.
But then the bride emerges from a vast red fabric totally emotionless, with not a hair out of place.
While director Tim Albery's emotionless, Grim Reaper vision of Claggart borders on the cartoonish, the role is sung to good effect by English bass Richard Van Allen.
An eerily emotionless Ridgway pleaded guilty - count by count - to killing at least 48 young women over a 20-year period.
Whereas the Woman is a wraith, emotionless and dead, the janitor (played with subtle understatement by Padraic O'Beirn) epitomizes quiet desperation.
This emotionless proximity of closely pressed bodies is a theater of clothed and unclothed body parts whose lead roles are played unwittingly by people en passant.
Then, seemingly calm and emotionless, the boy said nothing as he waited for the police to arrive and place him into custody.
In the next breath, however, and with the same deadpan, expressionless, emotionless, glazed look, Madam Albright repeated: "Those Palestinian rock throwers have placed Israel under siege," adding that the Israeli army is defending itself.