emotional support


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support

 [sŭ-port´]
1. a structure that bears the weight of something else.
2. a mechanism or arrangement that helps keep something else functioning.
3. the foundation upon which a denture rests.
caregiver support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of the necessary information, advocacy, and support to facilitate primary patient care by someone other than a health care professional. See also caregiver.
decision-making support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as providing information and support for a patient who is making a decision regarding health care.
emotional support
1. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of reassurance, acceptance, and encouragement in times of stress.
2. a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; actions designed to meet the affective, psychological, and social needs of the patient or client.
family support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of family values, interests, and goals.
support hose an elastic garment for a limb that enhances venous circulation through creation of a pressure gradient by fabric pressure. See also compression therapy.
physician support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as collaborating with physicians to provide quality patient care.
sibling support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting a sibling to cope with a brother's or sister's illness, chronic condition, or disability.
spiritual support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to feel balance and connection with a greater power.
sustenance support in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as helping a needy individual/family to locate food, clothing, or shelter.

emotional support1

the sensitive, understanding approach that helps patients accept and deal with their illnesses; communicate their anxieties and fears; derive comfort from a gentle, sympathetic, caring person; and increase their ability to care for themselves.
method Essential in providing emotional support are recognizing and respecting the individuality, personal preferences, and human needs of each patient. Understanding the sick and appreciating the psychological effects on the patient of the transition from health to illness are also important. The patient is encouraged to verbalize feelings and concerns, and the attentive listener avoids interjecting clichés, such as "Don't worry," "Take it easy," or "Everything will be all right." The nurse and other health team members realize that the patient may express some fears but may act out others through anger, hostility, silence, or assumed joviality. Efforts to change the patient, negative criticism, a judgmental attitude, and facial expressions that may indicate rejection are carefully avoided. Opportunities to listen to the troubled patient and provide compassionate and realistic counseling and care are sought.
interventions The nurse establishes means of communication, provides an atmosphere that invites the patient to discuss worrisome feelings, and presents a caring attitude. This is especially important when the illness damages the person's body image or self-concept.
outcome criteria Emotional support frequently improves the patient's psychological and physical state, often enabling him or her to accept the illness and to adjust with less anxiety to the changes required.

emotional support2

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as provision of reassurance, acceptance, and encouragement during times of stress. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.
References in periodicals archive ?
With this policy now in place, NAA's government affairs team will work with allied organizations both inside and outside of real estate to secure changes from HUD to the guidance on emotional support animals.
She is passionate about helping Lyme patients access the expertise and emotional support they need because she knows first-hand how devastating this disease can be.
Goren, a psychotherapist with the MultiCultural Wellness Center in Worcester, said she has written letters confirming an animal is needed for a patient's emotional support and she has also refused to write them.
In contrast, teammates were significantly more available than coaches to provide emotional support, and teammates' reality confirmation support made a significantly greater contribution than the reality confirmation support of coaches.
There was a significant association between perceived social support from family or 'significant others' and the use of emotional support and positive reframing as coping strategies (p=0.
Several men and women suggested that women who lack strong social support systems are especially likely to seek emotional support and intimacy in sexual relationships and may therefore be more vulnerable in these relationships.
The first category included pre-SARS variables: sex, age, education level, family income, availability of emotional support as indicated by the number of persons with whom one could talk and share worries, and whether one was a healthcare worker.
Still, regardless of whether one agrees or disagrees with a war's mission, historians as well as women should be clear about the full range of consequences of the extension of their emotional support to soldiers and the military.
Now San Esteban offers a warm and clean short term shelter, as well as medical and emotional support for HIV/AIDS patients.
To develop a community response program to provide immediate emotional support for male and female victims of sexual assault.
Jesus distanced himself from the position of Hillel, who allowed divorces on any grounds, and he discouraged divorce even for valid grounds, but may have allowed divorce in cases involving lack of material or emotional support (note that Jesus does not countermand Exod 21:10-11).
For example, a quarter of families with dying relatives receiving home hospice services reported unmet needs for emotional support (overall, half of patients were said to not have received enough emotional support, although this was 1.