emotional intelligence


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emotional intelligence

n.
Intelligence regarding the emotions, especially in the ability to monitor one's own or others' emotions.
The capabilities, competencies, and skills that influence one’s ability to succeed in coping with environmental demands and pressures that direct affect a person’s overall psychological well-being; a type of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one's own and others' emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use the information to guide thoughts and actions
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Stress Relationship between N Value 'r' Emotional Intelligence and stress 200 -0.47 Table 2 : The difference between mean Stress scores of students having ahigh and low level of Emotional Intelligence.
Emotional intelligence and intellectual ability play an important role in life of people.
Emotional Intelligence was measured using a validated and reliable instrument 'The Quick Emotional Intelligence Self-Assessment Questionnaire' adapted for the San Diego City College MESA Program from a model by Paul Mohapel.
Mixed model of emotional intelligence was propagated by Goleman (1995).
Self-awareness: The very first, and perhaps the most critical component of emotional intelligence is the ability to recognize and understand one's emotions, and their impact on others.
Elnashar, director of CCCHC, said: "Well-developed emotional intelligence skills are extremely valuable and important in the healthcare sector, particularly in culturally diverse environments like Qatar.
Emotional intelligence is claimed to have an impact on a variety of work behaviors such as commitment to the organization (Abraham, 2000; Nikolau & Tsaousis, 2002), teamwork (Druskat & Wolff, 2001), development of talent, innovation, quality of service, and customer loyalty (Goleman, 1998).
Although some researchers have explored the relationship between emotional intelligence and subjective well-being, there have been only a few studies in which the mediating role of altruistic behavior in this relationship has been examined.
The emotional regulation is the characteristic of emotional intelligence, which is the ability of person to think with emotion and communicate effectively the outcomes of that thinking (Cherniss and Golman, 2001).
An increased interest in research in the area of emotional intelligence has led to a quest for a strong empirical case connecting the measurement of social and emotional learning programs that teach emotional intelligence to improved school behavior and academic performance.
Objectives: To determine the predictors of Emotional Intelligence (EI), and its relationship with academic performance, leadership capacity, self-efficacy and the perceived stress between medical students at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
The question is: How can Sally and Fred use emotional intelligence to work together more productively?