compensation

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compensation

 [kom″pen-sa´shun]
1. the counterbalancing of any defect of structure or function.
2. a mental process that may be either conscious or, more frequently, an unconscious defense mechanism by which a person attempts to make up for real or imagined physical or psychological deficiencies.
3. in cardiology, the maintenance of an adequate blood flow without distressing symptoms, accomplished by such cardiac and circulatory adjustments as tachycardia, cardiac hypertrophy, and increase of blood volume by sodium and water retention.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pen-sā'shŭn),
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for fancied or real deficiencies.
[L. com-penso, pp. -atus, to weigh together, counterbalance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

compensation

(kŏm′pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. The act of compensating or the state of being compensated.
2. Biology The increase in size or activity of one part of an organism or organ that makes up for the loss or dysfunction of another.
3. Psychology Behavior that develops either consciously or unconsciously to offset a real or imagined deficiency, as in personality or physical ability.

com′pen·sa′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

compensation

Orthopedics A change of structure, position or function of a part in an attempt by the body to adjust to or neutralize the abnormal force of a deviation of structure, position or function of another part Psychiatry
1. An unconscious defense mechanism in which one attempts to compensate for real or perceived defects.
2. A conscious process in which one strives to compensate for real or perceived defects of physique, performance skills, or psychological attributes; often the 2 types merge. See Individual psychology, Overcompensation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
2. An unconscious mechanism by which one tries to make up for imagined or real deficiencies.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

com·pen·sa·tion

(kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
A process in which a tendency for a change in a given direction is counteracted by another change so that the original change is not evident.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"If this isn't a violation of the Emoluments Clause," noted Senator Dianne Feinstein, "I don't know what is." (First daughter Ivanka Trump pulled a similar trick last April, hosting, with her husband, Jared Kushner, a surf-and-turf dinner with the Chinese president at Mar-a-Lago the same day her company won provisional monopoly rights to sell Ivanka brand merchandise and spa services in the world's second-largest market.)
The Foreign and Domestic Emoluments Clauses arose out of the Founders' concern with corruption--in particular with the corrupting effects of gifts, payments, or benefits conferred on federal office holders either by foreign governments or their agents, or by any of the states constituting the United States.
8 ("[N]o Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under the[] [United States], shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.").
Refer to one provision as "the Emolument Clause" in the singular, and the other as "the Emoluments Clause" in the plural, tracking their actual language?
Director level salaries average $200,000 per year with a $116,000 bonus in the UAE, compared with about a total of $449,000 in London, according to Emolument. Managing director pay in London at an average of $931,000 was more than double the UAE's $437,000.
Lim added that emoluments had increased from the existing RM14.9 million to RM17 million for 2019, and that funding for Esscom services have also increased from RM19.2 million to RM25.6 million this year.
District Court, Trump's Justice Department lawyers said a stay of the trial and its discovery proceedings is appropriate due to the potential confidentiality of the presidential communications sought, the judiciary's possible encroachment on the executive branch and the uncertainty of whether Maryland and its co-plaintiff, the District of Columbia have standing to sue the president under the Constitution's Emoluments Clause.
Alice Leguay, Emolument cofounder and chief operating officer, said: "Despite high-delta remuneration, finance jobs are not topping our table.
Trump has been criticized for (https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/donald-trump/appeals-court-dismisses-emoluments-clause-case-against-trump-n1028216) possibly violating the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution and that he is using the presidency to enrich himself.
The decision is another setback for those who hoped to use the courts -- and the Constitution's emoluments clauses -- to stop Trump's private business from taking money from foreign governments.
The capital administration also fixed the monthly emoluments for part-time employees with effect from July 1.