eminence

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eminence

 [em´ĭ-nens]
a projection or boss.

em·i·nence

(em'i-nens), [TA]
A circumscribed area raised above the general level of the surrounding surface, particularly on a bone surface.
Synonym(s): eminentia [TA]
[L. eminentia]

eminence

/em·i·nence/ (em´ĭ-nĕns) a projection or boss.
caudal eminence  a taillike eminence in the early embryo, the remnant of the primitive node and the precursor of hindgut, adjacent notochord and somites, and the caudal part of the spinal cord.

eminence

(ĕm′ə-nəns)
n.
1. A position of great distinction or superiority: rose to eminence as a surgeon.
2. A rise of ground; a hill.
3.
a. A person of high station or great achievements.
b. also Eminence Roman Catholic Church Used with His or Your as a title and form of address for a cardinal.
4. A projection or protuberance from the surface of a body part, especially a bone.

em·i·nence

(em'i-nĕns) [TA]
A circumscribed area raised above the general level of the surrounding surface, particularly on a bone surface.
Synonym(s): eminentia [TA] .
[L. eminentia]

eminence

circumscribed prominence

em·i·nence

(em'i-nĕns) [TA]
Circumscribed area raised above general level of surrounding surface, particularly in bone.
[L. eminentia]

eminence

a projection or boss.

iliopubic eminence
on the leading edge of the pubis; an attachment point for abdominal muscles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eminent (left) and Jim Crowley winning at Newmarket last September
A statement from Texas Central said the company has built positive relationships with landowners on the rail's proposed route and planned only to use their "legal authority" of eminent domain as a last resort.
Our January 22 meeting began with an eminent domain caselaw update year in review presented by attorney Charles S.
As a basic text, this volume provides a good overview of the field of eminent domain with broad coverage of real estate fundamentals, valuation concepts, and particularly acquisition negotiations, valuation, and asset management.
The meeting started with attorneys for the city explaining that the council would not be voting to take anyone's land by eminent domain.
45) Therefore, the court, by its ruling in Jackson, established that when a government entity in Missouri wants to use eminent domain for economic development, the entity must have a clear non-economic purpose in addition to economic development rationales.
While the case--and a subsequent one filed by other banks discussed later in this article--turns on so-called ripeness for the lawsuits, court filings clearly describe the issues in the potential use of eminent domain to take mortgages.
By 1971, the Legislature had codified eminent domain procedures because so many cases were backlogged in the courts.
Supporters of the eminent domain option, including San Francisco-based Mortgage Resolution Partners LLC, have said that the method would cut through lengthy delays and provide effective, targeted relief to homeowners.
In the immediate term, it would bring development of Willet's Point in Queens to a halt, according to Lisa Bova-Hiatt, deputy chief in the New York City Law Department, where she is in charge of condemnation and eminent domain.
Although Conyers called protections against eminent domain abuse a laudable goal, he referred to the bill as a "one-size-fits-all, Washington-knows-best solution," and said that, "Congress should not now come charging in after seven years of work and presume to sit as a national zoning board, arrogating to our national government the right to decide which states have gotten the balance right and deciding which projects are or are not appropriate.
When we set out to develop the Symposium topic for the Fordham Urban Law Journal, we found inspiration in the recent court cases surrounding the Atlantic Yards project in Brooklyn and Columbia University's expansion in West Harlem and their use of eminent domain.