emigration

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emigration

 [em″ĭ-gra´shun]
the escape of leukocytes through the walls of small blood vessels; diapedesis.

em·i·gra·tion

(em'i-grā'shŭn),
The passage of white blood cells through the endothelium and wall of small blood vessels.
[L. e-migro, pp. -atus, to emigrate]

emigration

/em·i·gra·tion/ (em″ĭ-gra´shun) diapedesis.
leukocyte emigration  the escape (diapedesis) of leukocytes through the walls of small blood vessels.

em·i·gra·tion

(em-i-grā'shŭn)
The passage of white blood cells through the endothelium and wall of small blood vessels.
[L. e-migro, pp. -atus, to emigrate]

emigration

the movement of animals away from a specific area. Compare IMMIGRATION.

em·i·gra·tion

(em-i-grā'shŭn)
The passage of white blood cells through the endothelium and wall of small blood vessels.
[L. e-migro, pp. -atus, to emigrate]

emigration,

n movement of erythrocytes or leukocytes through the walls of the vessels that carry them.

emigration

the escape of leukocytes through the walls of small blood vessels; diapedesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jewish emigration has been the major issue that the United States employs to evaluate Soviet performance on family reunification issues.
Thus, a minimum expectation would be that emigration rates would not decline to levels lower than what they were prior to the creation of the regime.
The failure of the regime to restrain Soviet behavior is reflected by the figures in Table 1 as well as in Soviet efforts to restrict emigration and to make applications for an exit visa more difficult.
Because major increases in Jewish emigration correspond to the signing of arms control agreements in 1972, 1978, 1987, and 1990, a realist interpretation might appear convincing.
Yet emigration rates declined to very low levels during this period.
Jewish emigration provides a basis for performing such an analysis through the application of another model which more directly addresses the various internal and external factors influencing the pattern of Soviet behavior.
Rather, as Paula Stern points out, it was Senator Jackson himself who pushed forward the idea of linking the Soviet Jewish emigration issue to US-Soviet trade.
Unfortunately, the widest gap between Jackson and the Soviets was not about numbers, but was linked to their fundamental disagreement on whether an agreement on emigration would be public or private.
The "waiver compromise" negotiated by Kissinger and Jackson would have helped the USSR receive an exception from the law if they made emigration assurances, but the Soviets publicly made clear that they had never made the specific assurances that Kissinger had claimed.
Any move to increase emigration allowances directly after the agreement only would have exuded weakness.
The drop in emigration numbers after the passage of the amendment eventually raised concerns within the organized Jewish community.
AJCongress's testimony came at a time when there was a sizeable bump in Jewish emigration from the Soviet Union in 1978 and 1979, where the numbers reached 28,865 and 51,320, respectively.