emigration

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emigration

 [em″ĭ-gra´shun]
the escape of leukocytes through the walls of small blood vessels; diapedesis.

em·i·gra·tion

(em'i-grā'shŭn),
The passage of white blood cells through the endothelium and wall of small blood vessels.
[L. e-migro, pp. -atus, to emigrate]

emigration

/em·i·gra·tion/ (em″ĭ-gra´shun) diapedesis.
leukocyte emigration  the escape (diapedesis) of leukocytes through the walls of small blood vessels.

em·i·gra·tion

(em-i-grā'shŭn)
The passage of white blood cells through the endothelium and wall of small blood vessels.
[L. e-migro, pp. -atus, to emigrate]

emigration

the movement of animals away from a specific area. Compare IMMIGRATION.

em·i·gra·tion

(em-i-grā'shŭn)
The passage of white blood cells through the endothelium and wall of small blood vessels.
[L. e-migro, pp. -atus, to emigrate]

emigration,

n movement of erythrocytes or leukocytes through the walls of the vessels that carry them.

emigration

the escape of leukocytes through the walls of small blood vessels; diapedesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alroey's incorporation of statistical data pertaining to more than six thousand Jewish emigrants drawn from the Jewish Colonization Association and the Jewish Territorialist Organization archives into the Mass Jewish Migration Database [http:/Imjmd.
Hamid Fare'a, a Yemeni emigrant and businessman living with his family in Saudi Arabia, explains, "My daughters attend Saudi public school, but the eldest, who finished secondary school with a lower than 90 percent average, was unable to attend university.
A party delegation is making a visit to Coventry on Tuesday to raise the plight of Irish emigrants.
Moran notes that assisted emigrants (by which he means those assisted by landlords, poor law unions, the government or private philanthropists) accounted for between 250,000 and 300,000 of the eight million emigrants who left Ireland for North America in the period 1800-1921.
During the nineteenth century, most Irish emigrants were aided to leave their homeland, usually by relatives, already overseas, who sent remittances or prepaid passage tickets back to Ireland.
International Migration and Sending Countries examines global migration from a new angle, choosing to highlight the role of sending countries in migration management and in relations with emigrants and established diasporas.
5] Pozorrubio is the home of one of the country's highest concentrations of emigrant workers, and remittances to the families left behind are substantial.
One of the first gestures that emigrants were instructed to learn on arriving in America, as described by Irish emigrant Tom Brick in 1902, was to take off their caps to salute the Statue of Liberty as they passed it.
The historical background established, in the second section of the volume Huffman moves on to an examination of the identity and business activities of Cologner and Londoner emigrant families.
The book explores the possible routes through which Indian society can get a `return' from its large and well-established emigrant population of professionals in the US.
California's Emigrant Wilderness offers visitors a taste of the Sierra Nevada at its most sublime.
To determine the possibility of labour displacement and change in factor prices due to emigration, it is useful to investigate the relationship in production that has historically existed among the skilled and the unskilled, emigrant and non-migrant, and capital.