emetic


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Related to emetic: emetic drugs, tartar emetic

emetic

 [e-met´ik]
1. causing vomiting.
2. an agent that does this; examples are a strong solution of salt, mustard water, powdered ipecac, and ipecac syrup. Emetics should not be used when lye or other strong alkalis or acids have been swallowed, since vomiting may rupture the already weakened walls of the esophagus. Examples of such acids and alkalis are sodium hydroxide (caustic soda), potassium hydroxide (caustic potash), and carbolic acid. Emetics should also be avoided when kerosene, gasoline, nail polish remover, or lacquer thinner has been swallowed, since vomiting of these substances may draw them into the lungs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik),
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting, for example, ipecac syrup.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

emetic

(ĭ-mĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Causing vomiting.
n.
An agent that causes vomiting.

e·met′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

emetic

Herbal medicine
A herb used to induce vomiting; emetics include ipecac (Cephaelis ipecacuanha), lobelia (Lobelia inflata) and mustard seed (Brassica juncea).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

emetic

Therapeutics Any agent that causes vomiting
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik)
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

emetic

Any substance that causes vomiting.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Emetic

A medication or substance given to induce vomiting.
Mentioned in: Poisoning
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·met·ic

(ĕ-met'ik)
1. Relating to or causing vomiting.
2. An agent that causes vomiting, e.g., ipecac syrup.
[G. emetikos, producing vomiting, fr. emeō, to vomit]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The number of emetic episodes and frequency of nausea were also significantly lower for Palonosetron and it has a safety profile similar to that of Ondansetron.
(9) in their study group concluded that injection ondansetron decreases the incidence of emetic episodes than metoclopramide.
Frezard, "Enhanced schistosomicidal efficacy of tartar emetic encapsulated in pegylated liposomes," International Journal of Pharmaceutics, vol.
7-10 (severe)] .Vomiting was estimated based on frequency of emetic episode per 24 hours.[1-2 (mild) 3-4 (moderate) and more from 5 (severe)].
Therefore it was need of the day to unveil such drugs which may be cost effective and superior to the already available anti emetic drugs such as ondansetron and metoclopromide.
To minimize PONV and improve oral intake anesthesiologists have focused primarily on anaesthetic technique with minimal emetic potential.7,8 The exact mechanism for anti-emetic effect of dexamethasone is still unknown.
THE BBC Sports Personality of the Year award is something that Off The Bit usually tunes in to, but admittedly more as a pre-Christmas emetic rather than a review of the sporting year.
The introduction of highly emetic chemotherapy agents (eg cisplatin) in the 1970s, and the failure of anti-dopaminergic drugs to control associated nausea and vomiting lead to the recognition that nausea and vomiting involved many more pathways and neurotransmitters than was previously understood.
Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive endospore-forming ubiquitous bacterium that is responsible for causing emetic and diarrheal types of food poisoning.
Eamonn Gearon's study of the world's largest desert is thorough enough that it includes the time it spent being a sea, leaving it a fruitful hunting ground for marine palaeontologists, and covers the life it continues to support today, from Sodom apple to desert melon (warning: it's an emetic).