emergent literacy

emergent literacy

1. The attitudes and learning that lead to the ability to manipulate graphic symbols (e.g., the letters of the alphabet), form sounds, and develop vocabulary.
2. Attainment of mastery in reading and writing.
References in periodicals archive ?
For deeply understanding children's emergent literacy behaviors, children need to be observed carefully when they participate in literacy-related events such as writing independently (Otto, 2008).
Being read to is crucial for children's development in terms of language growth, emergent literacy and reading achievement.
Current evidence suggests that in the prior-to-school years phonics is best taught through an emergent literacy approach, where children acquire written language similar to oral language (Teale & Sulzby, 1986).
Before I introduced any key words, we embarked on a series of emergent literacy and tactile skill activities.
officials were also trained on Education, Leadership and Management and faculty of PITE and BOC were trained on Peace Education and Emergent Literacy & Math.
This study examined paternal and maternal bookreading frequency among 430 low-income families and investigated whether paternal bookreading and maternal bookreading predicted children's early language and cognitive development and emergent literacy skills.
The objective the Global Partnership for Education (GPE) Grant for Early Childhood Education Project is to improve emergent literacy and numeracy outcomes for children at the nursery level and primary Grade 1 in hinterland regions and targeted remote riverine areas .
A national mail survey of Head Start preschool teachers (N = 500) was conducted to assess their practices, the availability of specialist support, and their views related to emergent literacy instruction for Head Start children who have a disability or developmental delay.
Most research on emergent literacy focuses on children of preschool age and older; however, it is earlier in development when children build a foundation of knowledge upon which later reading skills will be further developed and refined.
Our struggle was more complex as we recognized over time that Kim and Marianne--mindful of the program's goal to foster emergent literacy development--had to grapple with accepting fully the families' differing perspectives on parenting, learning, and development while helping the families understand the school system to which their children would soon be headed.
The purpose of this article is to: 1) explore the significance of children's names to their cultural identity and to culturally responsive teaching practices, including useful classroom strategies; 2) discuss the importance of names as a window into children's emergent literacy development and how to maximize the use of names in the classroom; and 3) offer multicultural children's literature that feature children's names to build a classroom community focused on cross-cultural understanding.
In addition, this was inspired by the sociocultural perspective of literacy development (Vygotsky, 1978; Street, 1993, 1996; Prinsloo & Breier, 1996; Barton, 2001; Verhoeven & Snow, 2001) as well as an emergent literacy perspective (Teale & Sulzby, 1986; Neuman & Roskos, 1997; Tracey & Morrow, 2006).