emergent

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emergent

 [e-mer´jent]
1. coming out from a cavity or other part.
2. coming on suddenly.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·mer·gent

(ē-mĕr'jent),
1. Arising suddenly and unexpectedly, calling for quick judgment and prompt action.
2. Coming out; leaving a cavity or other part.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

emergent

Medspeak
adjective Referring to that which is becoming manifest—i.e., emerging.

Molecular biology
adjective Referring to a property in a system that cannot be predicted from the starting conditions.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

emergent

adjective Referring to that which is becoming manifest. See Emergent disease.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·mer·gent

(ē-mĕr'jĕnt)
1. Arising suddenly and unexpectedly, calling for quick judgment and prompt action.
2. Coming out; leaving a cavity or other part.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

emergent

  1. an aquatic plant having most of its structure above water.
  2. a tree which exceeds the height of the canopy.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

e·mer·gent

(ē-mĕr'jĕnt)
1. Arising suddenly, calling for prompt action.
2. Coming out; leaving a cavity or other part.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
With an increasing incidence of emergent diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Asian Bird Flu and SARS, whole social environments can be rendered at risk of rapid and complete transformation.
Robust, automated, nontemplate-based real-time processing techniques capable of monitoring large-scale disease, health-care, and environment tracking and surveillance data sets are needed to discriminate between naturally occurring events and emergent diseases or biologic terrorist attacks.
The active participation of combined health services in the early warning of the occurrence of suspected cases of emergent diseases is essential for effective, integrated surveillance.
Peptic ulcer, scarlet fever, cholera, and cellulitis are all included among the bacterially caused emergent diseases.

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