emergency


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emergency

 [e-mer´jen-se]
an unlooked for or sudden occurrence, often dangerous, such as an accident or an urgent or pressing need.
emergency department an area of a hospital especially equipped and staffed for emergency care. Popularly called emergency room.
emergency medical technician (EMT) a provider of emergency care (health care at the basic life support level); this may include spinal immobilization, administration of oxygen, and control of bleeding. In some states there are modular training programs where an EMT can add skills to the basic level.

e·mer·gen·cy

(ē-mĕr'jen-sē),
A patient's condition requiring immediate treatment.
[L. e-mergo, pp. -mersus, to rise up, emerge, fr. mergo, to plunge into, dip]

emergency

/emer·gen·cy/ (e-mer´jen-se) an unlooked for or sudden occurrence, often dangerous.

emergency

[imur′jənsē]
Etymology: L, emergere, to come forth
a perilous situation that arises suddenly and threatens the life or welfare of a person or a group of people, as a natural disaster, medical crisis, or trauma situation.

emergency

adjective Referring to an emergency.
 
noun An acute, unexpected development or situation that endangers life or limb and requires immediate action.

emergency

adjective Referring to an emergency noun An acute unexpected development or situation that endangers life or limb and requires immediate action

emergency

Any sudden crisis, calling for urgent intervention to avoid a serious outcome.

emergency,

n life-threatening situation requiring immediate medical attention.

e·mer·gen·cy

(ē-mĕr'jĕn-sē)
A patient's condition requiring immediate treatment.
[L. e-mergo, pp. -mersus, to rise up, emerge, fr. mergo, to plunge into, dip]

emergency,

n an unforeseen occurrence or combination of circumstances that calls for immediate action or remedy; pressing necessity.
emergency cart/kit,
n a portable container holding all the equipment and medicines that one would need to assist a patient in case of a medical crisis.
emergency medicine,
n a branch of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of conditions resulting from trauma or sudden illness.
emergency prevention,
n the procedures necessary to avoid creating a life-threatening crisis for a patient.
emergency training,
n the system of imparting knowledge and skills to be used in case of an accident or an unforeseen occurrence.
emergency treatment,
n treatment that must be rendered to the patient immediately for the alleviation of the sudden onset of an unforeseen illness or injury that, if not treated, would lead to further disability or death.
emergency treatment, burns,
n the immediate, urgent care given to a burn victim to stabilize the individual until further medical assistance can be found.
emergency treatment, cortical deficiency,
n the immediate, urgent care given to an individual experiencing adrenal crisis to stabilize that individual until further medical assistance can be found.
emergency treatment, facial fractures,
n the immediate, urgent care given to a patient with facial fractures to stabilize the individual until further medical assistance can be found.
emergency treatment, heart failure,
n the immediate, urgent care given to a patient experiencing heart failure to stabilize the individual until further medical assistance can be found.

emergency

a sudden and unexpected occurrence which requires urgent attention. Most veterinary practice is based on the need to take care of animal emergencies in medicine, surgery and reproduction. See also veterinary emergency service.

emergency care
delivery of urgent treatment to an animal, either as a temporary measure until full investigation and treatment is practical, or as a life-saving measure. See also critical care.
emergency slaughter
a desirable procedure if animals are to be dealt with humanely and farmers protected against avoidable financial loss. Sheep and cattle burned in bush fires are a case in point. Emergency slaughter of animals with unspecified illness is a common source of food poisoning unless the animals are submitted to rigorous meat inspection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rescue mobile posts of emergency paramedics were also deployed at important places of mass gatherings.
DOH and DSHS also invited community organizations from the private and nongovernmental sectors, as well as program managers from public sector--supported programs, to join a steering committee to look at the ways that existing services could be used to educate the public about unintended pregnancy and available resources, including emergency contraception.
To be sure be sure you are hiring a qualified firm, one needs to first determine what type of experience the company has had in preparing emergency action plans to date.
Instead of "reading, writing, and arithmetic" during an emergency, your spare "food, clothing, and shelter" could prove helpful.
Local officials described the closure of the Sherman Way hospital's emergency room as a further sign of the health care crisis gripping the San Fernando Valley.
Plan in-services and workshops for your emergency team to acquire emergency skills.
Contact your local Red Cross, emergency management officials, law enforcement agencies, or health-care providers to participate in a regional emergency prevention and response program.
The act would require each state or territory to develop a plan to address an emergency and defines a broad range of components to be included in the plan.
In its 279-page "State and Local Guide for All-Hazard Emergency Operations Planning," updated in September 1996, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends that a wide range of community groups--such as local media, social service agencies, churches and labor unions--help local officials create their emergency response plans.
Fire units, law enforcement agencies, municipal water department personnel, emergency medical services, and other public safety agencies could not coordinate their efforts in time to significantly limit the destruction.
Depending on the tolerance of your emergency loads for being without power for a given period of time, you might consider installing a permanent emergency generator dedicated to that equipment, rather than relying on portable generators that need to be hooked up after the power has gone out.
Anecdotal reports already have indicated that the prompt use of such devices can increase the chances of survival for those who are in need of such an emergency response.

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