emergency

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emergency

 [e-mer´jen-se]
an unlooked for or sudden occurrence, often dangerous, such as an accident or an urgent or pressing need.
emergency department an area of a hospital especially equipped and staffed for emergency care. Popularly called emergency room.
emergency medical technician (EMT) a provider of emergency care (health care at the basic life support level); this may include spinal immobilization, administration of oxygen, and control of bleeding. In some states there are modular training programs where an EMT can add skills to the basic level.

e·mer·gen·cy

(ē-mĕr'jen-sē),
A patient's condition requiring immediate treatment.
[L. e-mergo, pp. -mersus, to rise up, emerge, fr. mergo, to plunge into, dip]

emergency

/emer·gen·cy/ (e-mer´jen-se) an unlooked for or sudden occurrence, often dangerous.

emergency

[imur′jənsē]
Etymology: L, emergere, to come forth
a perilous situation that arises suddenly and threatens the life or welfare of a person or a group of people, as a natural disaster, medical crisis, or trauma situation.

emergency

adjective Referring to an emergency.
 
noun An acute, unexpected development or situation that endangers life or limb and requires immediate action.

emergency

adjective Referring to an emergency noun An acute unexpected development or situation that endangers life or limb and requires immediate action

emergency

Any sudden crisis, calling for urgent intervention to avoid a serious outcome.

emergency,

n life-threatening situation requiring immediate medical attention.

e·mer·gen·cy

(ē-mĕr'jĕn-sē)
A patient's condition requiring immediate treatment.
[L. e-mergo, pp. -mersus, to rise up, emerge, fr. mergo, to plunge into, dip]

emergency,

n an unforeseen occurrence or combination of circumstances that calls for immediate action or remedy; pressing necessity.
emergency cart/kit,
n a portable container holding all the equipment and medicines that one would need to assist a patient in case of a medical crisis.
emergency medicine,
n a branch of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of conditions resulting from trauma or sudden illness.
emergency prevention,
n the procedures necessary to avoid creating a life-threatening crisis for a patient.
emergency training,
n the system of imparting knowledge and skills to be used in case of an accident or an unforeseen occurrence.
emergency treatment,
n treatment that must be rendered to the patient immediately for the alleviation of the sudden onset of an unforeseen illness or injury that, if not treated, would lead to further disability or death.
emergency treatment, burns,
n the immediate, urgent care given to a burn victim to stabilize the individual until further medical assistance can be found.
emergency treatment, cortical deficiency,
n the immediate, urgent care given to an individual experiencing adrenal crisis to stabilize that individual until further medical assistance can be found.
emergency treatment, facial fractures,
n the immediate, urgent care given to a patient with facial fractures to stabilize the individual until further medical assistance can be found.
emergency treatment, heart failure,
n the immediate, urgent care given to a patient experiencing heart failure to stabilize the individual until further medical assistance can be found.

emergency

a sudden and unexpected occurrence which requires urgent attention. Most veterinary practice is based on the need to take care of animal emergencies in medicine, surgery and reproduction. See also veterinary emergency service.

emergency care
delivery of urgent treatment to an animal, either as a temporary measure until full investigation and treatment is practical, or as a life-saving measure. See also critical care.
emergency slaughter
a desirable procedure if animals are to be dealt with humanely and farmers protected against avoidable financial loss. Sheep and cattle burned in bush fires are a case in point. Emergency slaughter of animals with unspecified illness is a common source of food poisoning unless the animals are submitted to rigorous meat inspection.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Fire Safety firm is best suited to write a buildings fire safety plan to deal with fire and smoke related emergencies.
In likely outdoor program emergencies, the response and patient care phases are usually low duration.
Police officers have seen "a skeleton outline for emergencies," she said.
Types of basic equipment and medical devices include: CPR shields and other personal protective equipment (such as gloves), blood pressure cuffs and stethoscopes, thermometers, bag-valve masks, splints, penlights, wound care supplies, bronchial inhalers (prescription only), EpiPens (prescription only), ice bags, oral fluids for hydration, sterile water for irrigation, ice and cooling tubs for heat emergencies.
We can educate future citizens who will be volunteers and leaders during the emergencies of tomorrow, no matter what their academic major.
Operation HOPE's HOPE Coalition America also provides free financial counseling and casework services to people affected by natural disasters and national emergencies, helping more than 1,000 Americans in 125 cities in 35 states to date.
The Connect & Protect program allows government agencies, schools and private sector organizations to share information more effectively before, during, and after emergencies.
In many such emergencies, the need for interoperable communications extends well beyond the traditional emergency responders like police, fire and emergency medical services (EMS), to include utilities, disaster-relief workers and government agencies at the federal, state and local levels.
KIHEI, Hawaii -- The Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) today announced its collaboration on a new technology that provides governments, local agencies, and public/private institutions with the ability to better plan and prepare for a wide variety of emergencies.
TRCPA will utilize the service to provide members with critical information on events, including severe weather alerts, cyber threats and other emergencies to ensure continuity of business operations, as well as to share details on TRCPA events.
Nextel's ERT has responded to 17 Federally Declared State of Emergencies since August of 2002 - including forest fires, tornadoes, hurricanes and man-made events.
American Family Safety combines an entrepreneurial vision with a commitment to preparing families and businesses for emergencies or disasters before they happen," said Morley Ivers, president and founder of American Family Safety.