emergency

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emergency

 [e-mer´jen-se]
an unlooked for or sudden occurrence, often dangerous, such as an accident or an urgent or pressing need.
emergency department an area of a hospital especially equipped and staffed for emergency care. Popularly called emergency room.
emergency medical technician (EMT) a provider of emergency care (health care at the basic life support level); this may include spinal immobilization, administration of oxygen, and control of bleeding. In some states there are modular training programs where an EMT can add skills to the basic level.

e·mer·gen·cy

(ē-mĕr'jen-sē),
A patient's condition requiring immediate treatment.
[L. e-mergo, pp. -mersus, to rise up, emerge, fr. mergo, to plunge into, dip]

emergency

adjective Referring to an emergency.
 
noun An acute, unexpected development or situation that endangers life or limb and requires immediate action.

emergency

adjective Referring to an emergency noun An acute unexpected development or situation that endangers life or limb and requires immediate action

emergency

Any sudden crisis, calling for urgent intervention to avoid a serious outcome.

e·mer·gen·cy

(ē-mĕr'jĕn-sē)
A patient's condition requiring immediate treatment.
[L. e-mergo, pp. -mersus, to rise up, emerge, fr. mergo, to plunge into, dip]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Punjab Emergency Service rescued 16,266 victims of different emergencies while responding to 15,590 emergencies in all 36 districts of the province during Eidul Azha.
The Emergency Service Lahore responded to 1,055 emergencies including 581 road crashes.
Emergencies do not necessarily occur during banking hours.
The Board has become an effective organization for improving inter-departmental coordination and prevention of emergencies based on review of emergency data.
Preparation for emergencies helps maintain dancers' trust and enthusiasm, and good employer-employee relations.
Types of basic equipment and medical devices include: CPR shields and other personal protective equipment (such as gloves), blood pressure cuffs and stethoscopes, thermometers, bag-valve masks, splints, penlights, wound care supplies, bronchial inhalers (prescription only), EpiPens (prescription only), ice bags, oral fluids for hydration, sterile water for irrigation, ice and cooling tubs for heat emergencies.
Be sure to work with your camp director in carving out enough time for your staff to stay in shape and fit for responding to aquatic emergencies. Some camps pull all aquatics staff during a rest hour once a week while other day camps may have their staff practice after all the kids have gone home at the end of the day.
``As the saying goes, hope for the best but prepare for the worst.'' Conwy Council said they, like other authorities, had plans for a variety of emergencies. A spokeswoman said: ``In terms of a terrorist attack we would rely on the usual emergency services and follow directives from the Home Office.'' Denbighshire Council would deal with any kind of warfare under their major emergency plan.
At the time, Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy Thompson praised the model legislation as "an important tool for state and local officials to respond to bioterrorism and other public health emergencies." But the MERPA soon attracted attention from critics, and for good reason: Prepared by the Center for Law and the Public's Health at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities, the model legislation was an undisguised recipe for state-level tyranny.
"Emergencies" lasting over several fiscal years are implicitly contemplated.
Between 1998 and 2002, the city boosted its budgets every year for the 911 Center and Fire Department, two of the key agencies responsible for responding to emergencies. But the Department of Public Health, the leader on handling bioterrorism, has taken cuts the last two years.
* Public Health Threats and Emergencies Relief Act of 2000