emergence

(redirected from emergences)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jens),
1. Recovery of normal function following a period of unconsciousness, especially that associated with a general anesthetic.
2.

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jĕns)
1. A stage in recovery from general anesthesia that includes a return to spontaneous breathing, voluntary swallowing, and normal consciousness.
2. In microbiology, the appearance and identification of new microorganisms or strains of previously identified species.
[L. emergo, arise, come forth]

e·mer·gence

(ē-mĕr'jĕns)
Stage in recovery from general anesthesia that includes return to spontaneous breathing, voluntary swallowing, and normal consciousness.
[L. emergo, arise, come forth]
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 8.2 h of emergence was recorded at Reed Bat Cave.
A total of 5.7 h of emergence was recorded at Selman Bat Cave.
Citizen scientists expressed a range of positive accounts of the periodical cicada emergence from rescuing emerging adults from predation, photography, home-school education opportunities, to a willingness to provide additional monitoring information throughout the emergence event.
Recommendations for improving future cicada monitoring projects include: 1) coordinating interested South Carolina institutions and agencies in 2023 to create one common website with one supervisor, 2) implementing early outreach efforts to inform citizen scientists on what to expect from the upcoming emergence to reduce negative reactions and 3) include a short questionnaire to more accurately assess citizen scientists' perception of the emergence experience.
larvarum were collected in vitro, and the time of pupation and emergence, as well as the quantity of parasitoids, were recorded.
There were also isolated emergences of periodical cicadas from several Brood X locations in 2008.
Second, we are not puppet before the emergent organizations and organizational emergences. We can handle them and control them as if we are vicarious selector.
Recent examples of potential emerging infectious diseases that were realized include the emergence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 in human populations, in which the close-contact nature of the infection process prevented transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from primates to humans (6,24).
Adult cicadas live for three or four weeks above ground and the mute females are ready to mate 10 days after emergence. Each female lays 400-600 eggs in slits they make in branches and twigs of nearly 80 preferred species of trees and shrubs.
To determine which meteorological factors might predict when in May the emergence would begin, it was necessary to gather weather information from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency for previous emergence years.